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The Val Johnson Incident: A UFO encounter that made Marshall County famous

by Hannah Jones                  May 24, 2018                      (citypages.com)

• On August 27, 1979, Marshall County (Minnesota) Deputy sheriff Val Johnson was driving in a road about ten miles outside of Stephen MN on a clear night when he saw an 8- to 12-inch ball of light floating about three-and-a-half feet off the ground, zooming along the road. He sped up, following the glowing orb down a dark stretch of road. Suddenly the bright light was upon him, and he remembered the sound of glass breaking and the brakes seizing up.

• Johnson woke up 39 minutes later with his head on the steering wheel. His car was sitting on its side, halfway off the road in the opposite lane. His head hurt. His eyes hurt. But he managed to radio headquarters to say that something hit his car. The windshield was shattered and the hood dented. (see image above) The patrol car’s antennae were bent backward and one of the headlights was busted. An ambulance took Johnson to a hospital. He was treated and released for eye burns, the kind welders get from staring at the sparks.

• During questioning, they noticed his watch was 14 minutes behind. Johnson had always been fastidious about syncing his watch and his car clock with headquarters when he started his shifts. They also discovered the clock in his car was 14 minutes slow.

• They called in Allan Hendry, an investigator with the Center for UFO Studies in Illinois. Hendry studied the car and the circumstances, and determined that it wasn’t a hoax. Other experts were called in but none could explain the incident. Johnson and his family were inundated in calls from the press. But as time went on, other headlines crowded the front page and the event fell into relative obscurity. Then along came the internet. “There’s probably more interest in [Johnson] now than there was 20 years ago,” says Kent Broten, president of the Marshall County Historical Society. The Marshall County Museum still has Johnson’s car, and it’s one of their most popular exhibits.

• To this day, the incident remains unsolved.

 

It was late August in Marshall County, 1979. Deputy sheriff Val Johnson was on patrol in his Ford LTD at 1:30 a.m., heading out on County Road 5. He got about 10 miles away from Stephen when he saw a light through the driver’s side window.

It was an 8- to 12-inch ball of light floating about three-and-a-half feet off the ground, zooming along the road. Johnson thought it had to be a truck with a busted headlight. But it was too bright for that. Whatever it was, Johnson decided to follow it.

He sped up to 55 mph, following the glowing orb down a dark stretch of country road. He’s not certain what happened next. One second the light was dead ahead, and the next it was upon him, painfully bright. All he remembers is the sound of glass breaking and the brakes seizing up.

He woke up 39 minutes later with his head on the steering wheel. He raised it to take in a sideways view of the world. His car was sitting on its side, halfway off the road in the opposite lane. His head hurt. His eyes hurt. But he managed to radio headquarters.

When they asked what was wrong, he told them he honestly didn’t know. All he knew was that something hit his car.

Rescuers found his car in a sorry state. The windshield was shattered, and there was a hefty dent in the hood. The antennae were folded neatly backward, with all the desiccated corpses of careless insects still attached. One of the headlights was busted.

An ambulance transported Johnson to a Warren hospital. Doctors determined he’d sustained eye burns, the kind welders get from staring at the sparks shooting off their instruments. He was treated and released.

He told Sheriff Dennis Brekke what he saw. He had no explanation for it. During questioning, they noticed his watch was 14 minutes behind. This was strange for Johnson. He had always been fastidious about syncing his watch and his car clock with headquarters when he started his shifts. They also discovered the clock in his car was 14 minutes slow.

The department was dumbfounded. They had no idea how any of this could be explained. That’s when Brekke called the Center for UFO Studies in Illinois. UFO investigator Allan Hendry turned up in Warren the next day.

Hendry was an astronomer, ufologist and advocate for the “scientific study of UFOs.” His book, “The UFO Handbook: A Guide to Investigating, Evaluating, and Reporting UFO Sightings” was all about being comprehensive and critical of supposed encounters, and separating tricks of the mind from the truly unexplained. Hendry studied the car and the circumstances. He came to only one conclusion: whatever happened, this wasn’t a hoax.

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Duke Brickhouse is a former trial lawyer and entertainment attorney who has refocused his life’s work to exposing the truth of our subjugated planet and to help raise humanity’s collective consciousness at this crucial moment in our planet’s history, in order to break out of the dark and negative false reality that is preventing the natural development of our species, to put our planet on a path of love, light and harmony in preparation for our species’ ascension to a fourth density, and to ultimately take our rightful place in the galactic community.

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