Tag: Tom Delonge

Do Aliens Exist? Blink 182 Co-Founder and Ex-Pentagon Official Are Determined to Prove We’re Not Alone

by Keith Kloor                    September 20, 2018                       (newsweek.com)

• On July 29th, Luis Elizondo, the former career military intelligence official in charge of the Pentagon’s UFO research program from 2007 to 2012 and current member of rock star Tom DeLonge’s ‘To The Stars Academy’, spoke at the annual Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) Symposium at the Crowne Plaza hotel in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

• Elizondo’s background is typical of a straight-arrow military officer with a distinguished career. He is the son of a Cuban exile who participated in the Bay of Pigs in 1961. Elizondo worked as a bouncer while attending the University of Miami. After graduating in 1995, he joined the Army and trained to be a military spy. Later, at the Pentagon, Elizondo showed no sign of being a disgruntled employee, spending much of his career chasing militants in South America and the Middle East.

• In 2010, Elizondo was made the head of a small group within the Pentagon charged with investigating reports of “unexplained aerial phenomena” – a less controversial term for UFOs. It was an ¬obscure, low-budget initiative created in 2007 at the behest of then-Senator Harry Reid of Nevada, and operated jointly by Elizondo and Robert Bigelow of Bigelow Aerospace. But the results of their UFO investigations made Elizondo a true believer. Although the Pentagon program was officially shut down in 2012, Elizondo insists it remains ongoing.

• Elizondo resigned from the Pentagon in October 2017 protesting what he considered lackluster support and unnecessary secrecy. “Why aren’t we spending more time and effort on this (UFO) issue?” Elizondo wrote to Defense Secretary James Mattis in his resignation letter, “Despite overwhelming evidence at both the classified and unclassified levels, certain individuals in the Department (of Defense) remain staunchly opposed to further research on what could be a tactical threat to our pilots, sailors, and soldiers, and perhaps even an existential threat to our national security.”

• When Tom DeLonge launched ‘To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science’ in October 2017, Elizondo joined and quickly became its public face. Its mission: to advance UFO research, produce science-fiction-themed entertainment about UFOs and, with luck, glean some insight into the super-advanced technology displayed by UFOs (such as spaceships that can seemingly defy gravity) that the Pentagon keeps ignoring. Over the past year, the Academy claims to have attracted more than 2,000 investors and raised roughly $2.5 million.

• ‘To The Stars Academy’ also boasts such heavy-hitters as Chris Mellon, the former deputy ¬assistant secretary of defense for intelligence during the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations who had oversight of the Pentagon’s super-¬secret ‘special access programs’ and highly classified ‘black operations’; Jim Semivan, a 25-year veteran of the CIA’s National Clandestine Service; and Hal Puthoff an electrical engineer who conducted controversial research on psychic abilities for the CIA and the DIA.

• The $22 million Pentagon UFO project marked the first time that the U.S. government admitted to studying UFOs since the Air Force’s ‘Project Blue Book’ was shut down in 1968. Despite Senator Reid’s assertion in an interview with New York magazine that “we have hundreds and ¬hundreds of papers… 80 percent at least, is public,” and Mellon’s statement in Washington Post op-ed, that referred to a “growing body of empirical data,” Elizondo says that much of these “large volumes” of academic studies and data are “FOIA-exempt,” meaning the public is not given access to them.

• There are those in the UFO community who are skeptical of DeLonge’s motives. They believe he simply wants to profit off his UFO-related books, websites and merchandise, and that his antics are part of the business plan.

• As the Academy’s head of Global Security and Special Programs, Elizondo serves as a liaison to the government, including Congress, the Pentagon and the intelligence services. Elizondo thinks that the next six months or so will be pivotal to the success of ‘To the Stars’ when he expects to be able to present more data on UFO sightings. “I’m not worried about credibility,” Elizondo says. “I’m worried about facts.” Reminded that the only facts the public has now are grainy videos, he insists, “There is data. It’s not out yet.”

• Elizondo understands why many remain dubious. “I get it. I’m a career spy,” he says.” “No, I am not running a government disinformation campaign.” “I took a huge risk in leaving a safe job to do this. If this doesn’t pan out, I’ll be working at Walmart.” “But…as crazy as it sounds, this is real.”

 

“I know what I saw.”

It was late July, and Teresa Tindal, a 39-year-old administrator for a consulting firm, was describing the incident that made her a believer: a round, golden object hovering in the evening sky over Tucson, Arizona. Weather balloon? No way. It could only be one thing: a UFO.

This kind of certainty had brought her—and 400 other people—to the Crowne Plaza hotel in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, for the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) Symposium, the “premiere UFO event of the year,” according to its literature. They had gathered to talk about extraterrestrials, UFOs and how to avoid being abducted by an alien mothership (hint: yelling at it doesn’t work). “There are too many people that have seen things,” Christine Thisse, 44, a soft-spoken mother from Michigan, told Newsweek.

There were the typical guest speakers giving talks with titles like “Unexplained Disappearances in Rural Areas” and “Report From Mars,” in which a physicist lays out his theory that 75,000 years ago an intergalactic nuclear war wiped out a Martian civilization. And there were famous abductees, like Travis Walton, a former logger whose story of alien captivity became the 1993 movie Fire in the Sky.

But this year offered another attraction—a new, and extremely unlikely, superstar: Luis Elizondo. Seven months earlier, The New York Times had published a front-page story on the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program, a “shadowy” initiative at the Pentagon that “investigated reports of unidentified flying objects.” Elizondo, a burly Miami native with a billy-goat beard and colorful tattoos, was the career military intelligence official put in charge of the program a few years after it formed in 2007, until, according to the Pentagon’s press office, it was discontinued in 2012. (Elizondo insists the work is ongoing.) Last year, he resigned from the Pentagon, protesting what he considered lackluster support and unnecessary secrecy—red meat for the X-Files crowd. “Why aren’t we spending more time and effort on this issue?” he wrote to Defense Secretary James Mattis in his resignation letter.

In the private sector, Elizondo soon found an unlikely ally in his quest for the truth: Tom DeLonge, the former frontman for the pop/punk band Blink-182, the group behind a song called “Aliens Exist.” Turns out DeLonge actually believed it. In 2017, he launched To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science, and Elizondo quickly became its public face. The mission: to advance UFO research, produce science-fiction-themed entertainment about UFOs and, with luck, glean some insight into the super-advanced technology displayed by UFOs (such as spaceships that can seemingly defy gravity) that the Pentagon keeps ignoring.

The academy claims to have attracted more than 2,000 investors and raised roughly $2.5 million, and Elizondo found a mostly enthusiastic crowd in Cherry Hill. “Sometimes people may have associated you with being fringe—being out there,” he told the MUFON audience over a buffet dinner. “All along, you were right.” Not everyone was convinced: Some cited a lack of evidence in his presentation. Tindal was suspicious of the Pentagon connection. “It could be a cover for something else,” she said.

But if Elizondo is trying to lend credibility to research on unexplained sightings, why would he partner with a guy whose band had a hit album titled Enema of the State? And why would he choose as a venue a UFO conference teeming with conspiracy theorists?

“We have to start somewhere,” he told Newsweek that day. “I don’t get invited to Stanford or MIT.”

Super Hornets and Tic Tacs

Each year, thousands of people report UFO sightings to various authorities—the police, the Pentagon, radio talk show hosts. By one count, more than 100,000 sightings have been reported since 1905. Nearly all can be explained away as clouds, meteors, birds, weather balloons or some other quotidian phenomenon. Efforts at rational debunking serve only to harden the conviction of the true believers, who are convinced that abundant evidence of alien visitations is hidden in secret military documents—literal X-files—locked away in the bowels of the so-called deep state.

The X-files conspiracy theory is the beating heart of the UFO community—an article of faith among enthusiasts and the basis of almost every call to action on social media (#Disclosure). It is also encouraged by some prominent people, including John ¬Podesta, who lamented on Twitter a few years ago that he’d failed to secure the #disclosure of the UFO files, “despite being President Bill Clinton’s chief of staff.

When Elizondo went public, it gave a sheen of credibility to the conspiracy crowd. His background is typical of a straight-arrow military officer with a distinguished career. He is the son of a Cuban exile who participated in the Bay of Pigs—the failed CIA-¬sponsored plot to overthrow Fidel Castro in 1961. Elizondo worked as a bouncer while attending the University of Miami. After graduating in 1995, he joined the Army and trained to be a military spy. Later, at the Pentagon, Elizondo showed no sign of being a disgruntled employee or a loon, spending much of his career in the shadows, chasing militants in South America and the Middle East.

In 2010, he started to run a small group charged with investigating reports of “unexplained aerial phenomena”—a less controversial term for UFOs. It was an ¬obscure, low-budget initiative created three years before at the behest of then-Senator Harry Reid of Nevada. Details are murky, but the $22 million program seems to have been operated jointly by Elizondo and Bigelow Aerospace, a Nevada-based defense contractor whose billionaire owner, Robert Bigelow, is an avid believer in UFOs.

Two months before the Times published its front-page story, Elizondo retired from the Pentagon. He shows Newsweek what he says is a copy of his resignation letter, dated October 4, 2017, and addressed to Mattis. The letter expresses some frustration about the lack of attention his program was getting. And it suggests that something he learned at the Pentagon turned him into a true believer. “Despite overwhelming evidence at both the classified and unclassified levels,” he wrote, “certain individuals in the Department remain staunchly opposed to further research on what could be a tactical threat to our pilots, sailors, and soldiers, and perhaps even an existential threat to our national security.”

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They’ve ‘Seen Things’

by Rozette Rago                 August 14, 2018                        (nytimes.com)


• UFO social groups are becoming popular. One such group was begun in Los Angeles by Robert Bingham, 62, who has held his annual UFO “Summon Events” in an LA park since 2010.  (seen above)  It began when Bingham was 39 and saw a 20-foot tall worm-shaped ship zipping through the clouds. He’s seen and taken photos of a ‘saucer’ and some flying objects shaped like beans. His photos began to attract dozens of believers from all over the world who come to share their own stories of UFOs and extraterrestrial communications. Bingham attempts to summon UFOs at these gatherings.

• “It’s a great community because you can talk about anything and you’re not worried about being called crazy,” said Hans Boysen, 53, who has participated in the last seven summoning sessions with Bingham since 2011. Boysen has gone on to co-found another group called the L.A. U.F.O. Channel who meet monthly.

• Rafael Cebrian, 29, a two-time attendee, brought a curious friend who was visiting from Spain. He said it was about being open and being in the right state of mind.

• Angel Llewellyn, 49, drove to Bingham’s event from San Jose, California, for a second year as a form of pilgrimage. “It’s like he charges you,” she said (as in ‘inspires’ you, not as in charging you admission). “He teaches you how to call [UFOs] and what to think and they just, boom, boom, boom. It’s like fishing. You never know what you’re going to get.”

• Other groups like the U.F.O. and Paranormal Research Society focus on discussions, often with speakers who talk about their research and experiences. A nonprofit group called the Mutual U.F.O. Network, or Mufon, founded in 1969, has over 4,000 members worldwide and convenes a yearly symposium. This year, a former Pentagon intelligence officer, Luis Elizondo, will give the Mufon keynote address. Many in the community believe that organizations such as the ‘To The Stars Academy for Arts and Science’, headed by Elizondo and former Blink-182 guitarist Tom DeLonge, are just the beginning to discovering the truth about ETs and UFOs.

• Yasmin Joyner, 35, an artist, recently formed another UFO discussion group, Indigo Army, that she hopes will attract a younger and more diverse crowd. Its members organize sightings at one another’s houses and nearby parks. Joyner says she understands that there are consequences to being outspoken about beliefs that many people may deem weird or crazy. “I think my family was a bit worried that I had snapped or something, but once they saw my footage and what I was seeing, they understood,” she said.

• Mallory Jackson, 26, who attends ‘hangouts’ led by Mr. Bingham and the Indigo Army, says she finds it difficult to maintain relationships outside the U.F.O. community with people who might not be as understanding of her interests. “[Y]ou’ll see all ages, all ethnicities, all genders,” says Ms. Jackson. “It’s beautiful, and we’re all just trying to figure it out as we go.” She became friends with several members “right away” before meeting another longtime attendee of Mr. Bingham’s events, Jim Martin, 38, who is now her boyfriend.

• How exactly does the group try to summon UFOs? Most agree that it’s similar to meditating, accompanied by a physical sensation. Joyner says the important thing is to focus. At the event in April, some participants closed their eyes and stood silently. Some stared intently into the sky. When someone spots something, they train a telescope on the object which is connected to a camera and a screen that shows and records what is being seen. They post the best videos on their YouTube channel.

 

Robert Bingham has “seen things.” When he was 39, he looked skyward and noticed a worm-shaped ship about 20 feet tall zipping through the clouds.

Unusual things kept popping up around him — or above him, rather. He saw a saucer and some flying objects shaped like beans next. He snapped a picture.

For over ten years, he kept his sightings to himself. That changed in 2010, when his neighbor came over to do some plumbing work. Mr. Bingham showed him his photos. The neighbor asked if he could invite his brother, who was very interested in unidentified flying objects, or U.F.O.s.

In awe of what they saw, they asked if they could invite more people to speak with Mr. Bingham — 40 more, actually. More than eight years ago, that was the first meeting of what is now known as “Summon Events with Robert Bingham,” at a park in Los Angeles across the street from where Mr. Bingham worked as a security guard.

Mr. Bingham, 62, an unassuming man who describes himself as shy, has become the nexus of a community of U.F.O. hunters in Los Angeles, fervent believers who come together to share their stories and persuade skeptics that extraterrestrial communications aren’t just a conceit for television shows.

Since then, he has attracted U.F.O. enthusiasts from all over the world, drawn together by the same questions: What are these things in the sky, exactly, and how can we learn more about them?

While there is just not enough documentation or scientific evidence to begin to explain or even confirm these sightings, that doesn’t stop the dozens of people that once a year descend on the same park to watch and assist Mr. Bingham as he tries to summon the “objects,” as they call them, and also to hang out with other enthusiasts who have turned into friends.

“It’s a great community because you can talk about anything and you’re not worried about being called crazy,” said Hans Boysen, 53, who has participated in the last seven summoning sessions with Bingham since 2011.

Other groups, like the U.F.O. and Paranormal Research Society, don’t organize sighting sessions, but rather focus on discussions, often with speakers who talk about their research and experiences. A nonprofit group called the Mutual U.F.O. Network, or Mufon, founded in 1969, has over 4,000 members worldwide and convenes a yearly symposium. This year, a former Pentagon intelligence officer, Luis Elizondo, will give the keynote address.

Last year, The New York Times conducted interviews and obtained records pertaining to the $22 million spent on the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program. The program — parts of which remain classified — investigated reports of unidentified flying objects, according to Defense Department officials. According to the article, officials insisted that the effort had ended after five years, in 2012. The article also stated that Sara Seager, an astrophysicist at M.I.T., cautioned that not knowing the origin of an object does not mean that it is from another planet or galaxy. “When people claim to observe truly unusual phenomena, sometimes it’s worth investigating seriously,” she said. But, she added, “what people sometimes don’t get about science is that we often have phenomena that remain unexplained.”

As much as scientists deal with probabilities, they rely on data and the reality is, no matter how many videos people upload on YouTube, they’re simply not enough to draw any definitive conclusions from.

But that doesn’t stop this community from searching. Many in the community that forms around Mr. Bingham believe that the multimillion-dollar alien research efforts of the former Blink-182 guitarist and singer Tom DeLonge are just the beginning to finding out some answers. Mr. DeLonge made headlines after To the Stars Academy of Arts & Science, a research group he founded — Mr. Elizondo is its director of global security and special programs — released declassified footage from the Department of Defense and continues his efforts.

Angel Llewellyn, 49, drove to the event from San Jose, Calif., for a second year as a form of pilgrimage. She said she started seeing things right after attending to Mr. Bingham’s event for the first time.

“It’s like he charges you,” she said. “He teaches you how to call them and what to think and they just, boom, boom, boom. It’s like fishing. You never know what you’re going to get.”

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DeLonge’s UFO Team Studying Alien Metal

by MJ Banias                     August 4, 2018                     (mysteriousuniverse.org)

• Tom DeLonge’s (pictured above) public benefit corporation ‘To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science’ has announced its “flagship” research project, the ‘Acquisition and Data Analysis of Materials’, known as A.D.A.M. To collect and evaluate material samples from crashed UFOs.

• These ‘meta-materials’ are typically an amalgamation of alloys not found on Earth and of “unknown origin”, constructed from multiple elements to form composite metals. They have the ability to manipulate and absorb electromagnetic waves to allow a spaceship to cloak itself from view or radar. It can also enhance a communication transmission signal.

• It seems that with the recent prominence of To The Stars Academy, people have been bringing to them small pieces of UFO debris they’d been keeping. “Due to the widespread publicity that TTSA has received, individuals claiming possession of materials that might be from advanced aerospace vehicles of unknown origin have come forth and have agreed to provide them to TTSA for analysis,” said Dr. Hal Puthoff who serves as Vice President of Science and Technology for To the Stars Academy. Meta-materials seem to be the ‘next big thing’ in UFO research.

• The project is being headed up by Dr. Puthoff’s own EarthTech International under a “very straightforward contractual relationship” with To the Stars Academy. “The results will be provided to TTSA for their dissemination as they see fit,” said Puthoff.

• Asked whether they had any strange meta-materials in their possession, Puthoff responded, “Materials with interesting claimed histories have been provided, but technical evaluation of them is yet to be carried out, so it is too early to say.”

• Critics in the UFO community have suggested that this is just an attempt by To the Stars Academy to remain relevant. Others have suggested that this is just one big government conspiracy to scoop up UFO meta-materials and hide them away from the public.

• Looking at the overall history of UFO studies, no single project or program has ever succeeded in solving the enigma. Will the A.D.A.M. Project create a new type of conductive material for everyday use while the UFO phenomenon itself remains as elusive as ever? How will we perceive meta-materials in two decades when it is in our everyday gadgets? Once we have become masters of meta-material technology, what will become the ‘next big thing’?

 

Last week, To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science (TTSA), Tom DeLonge’s public benefit corporation dedicated to seeking answers to the UFO mystery, announced that it was launching its “flagship” research project.

The Acquisition and Data Analysis of Materials, known as A.D.A.M., focuses on, “the collection and scientific evaluation of material samples obtained through reliable reports of advanced aerospace vehicles of unknown origin.”

              Dr. Hal Puthoff
This material often referred to as ‘meta-materials,’ is usually a bizarre collection and amalgamation of alloys. Not found in nature, meta-materials are constructed from multiple elements to form composite metals. The various elements are arranged in patterns, often on the microscopic level, to manipulate electromagnetic waves. They can bend these waves, absorb them, enhance them and block them for a variety of purposes. Technologically, this is an important frontier that has been talked about a lot in physics.

Building an aircraft, for example, out of a specific meta-material which absorbs EM radiation would fundamentally make it invisible on radar, and even, with the right combination of elements, the naked eye. Perhaps you wanted to transmit a signal, like a radio wave. If the antenna used to transmit the signal is made out of this fancy new meta-material, you could fashion it using certain patterns of elements that would significantly enhance the signal and cast it across a great distance.

The A.D.A.M. project is suggesting that anomalous aerial phenomena, UFOs basically, seem to be leaving similar materials behind. Basically, little bits of unknown aerial vehicles are showing up. While stories and accounts of UFO debris fill the narrative, like a crashed flying saucer outside of Roswell, meta-materials seem to be the next big thing in UFO research. While there exists significant disagreement on the whole UFO meta-material thing, the project is being headed up by Dr. Hal Puthoff and EarthTech International.

Dr. Puthoff has a long history in dealing with esoteric stuff, such as parapsychology and UFOs. That being said, he is an established scientist, educated at Stanford University, who focuses on exotic physics. While he has many critics, to any card-carrying member of the UFO community, he is a big name.

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