Tag: Tom Delonge

Former Blink 182 rockstar, Tom DeLonge, is having great difficulty in convincing many UFO researchers that his To the Stars Academy is not a Deep State operation. Many believe that DeLonge has been coopted by savvy Deep State operatives who gave him access to the rarefied world of highly classified Special Access Programs in order to manipulate him.

Despite the success of the To The Stars Academy in getting mainstream media attention to study UFO files released by the U.S. military intelligence community, a number of UFO researchers have become very vocal in their criticism of DeLonge, basically claiming that he is in over his head and is being played by the Deep State.

The concern has become so great that Peter Levenda, one of DeLonge’s co-authors in his book series, Sekret Machines, attended the Contact in the Desert Conference in June to dispel such concerns. I recently was able to view the video of his presentation given on June 3, 2018 which was aptly titled: “Conspiracy Theories & UFOlogy: Tom Delonge & the Deep State Scenario”.

In the abstract he wrote:

This will be a discussion of the current theories in Ufological circles that Tom DeLonge and the To The Stars Academy are agents of a “deep state” that wishes to manipulate Ufology, or expectations concerning UFOs, for the benefit of a secret cabal of government insiders. .

In his nearly two hour presentation, Levenda offered a strident defense of DeLonge, the To the Stars Academy, and his own involvement in the book series. However, Levenda’s defense was so unconvincing that he inadvertently raised doubts with viewers, such as myself, over whether DeLonge may indeed be in over his head and has been coopted into a Deep State operation.

Levenda began by describing his own background and research that has made him a successful book author, who has travelled widely and interviewed many infamous individuals. His first book, Unholy Alliance: A History of Nazi Involvement with the Occult (1995) has become a classic and was among the first that examined the cult beliefs that dominated Nazi Germany’s ruling elite.

I read the book and have it on my bookshelf as a reliable source on Nazi occult beliefs. Levenda’s scholarship won him many fans, including myself.

What did raise my eyebrows during his Contact in the Desert presentation was Levenda’s account of how in 1968, as a 17 year old, he was involved in establishing a cult church in New York city where he and his buddy were self-appointed bishops.

Levenda described how he and his buddy gate-crashed the Robert Kennedy funeral impersonating high level church dignitaries who were transported in a limousine. Was this all simply an elaborate lark by two precocious 17 year olds as Levenda contends, or was something more sinister at play?

What we do know for certain is that Levenda and his buddy became targets for recruitment by rival strange churches, which were fronts for the CIA and other intelligence agencies as Levenda has publicly acknowledged. He says that he declined such offers, and his subsequent worldwide travel and research, was prompted by intellectual curiosity into the bizarre and unusual.

Perhaps, but the legitimate question can be raised about whether his subsequent writing career was established as a suitable cover for recruitment as a CIA agent and/or operative. After all, as a precocious 17 year old, he had displayed a clear talent for deception and establishing fake identities. This surely would have made him an ideal recruit for the shadowy world of CIA covert operations.

It is what Levenda had to say about critics of the To The Stars Academy that really raised my suspicions during his presentation. He called out Dr. Steven Greer as one of the more prominent critics, and set out to contrast Greer and DeLonge’s approaches to gathering UFO evidence.

Whereas Greer was depicted as touting up to 1000 unnamed whistleblowers/insiders spilling the beans on the UFO/extraterrestrial cover up, DeLonge was credited with getting former high level government and corporate officials to come forward and risk their reputations by joining his To The Stars Academy.

The audience was told that Greer was touting speculation by unknown sources, whereas DeLonge was promoting scientific research by having hard facts and evidence discussed by experts who had verifiable credentials in the military industrial complex.

There was a major flaw in Levenda’s critique of Greer. It is simply not true to say that Greer has touted unknown whistleblowers as sources on the UFO coverup. In his May 2001, Disclosure Project Press Conference, he got 21 former military, government and corporate figures to go public. In the subsequent book, Disclosure: Military and Government Witnesses Reveal the Greatest Secrets in Modern History, there were over 60 individuals who by a vast majority went on the record in terms of their identities and credentials.

While it is true that the bulk of Greer’s hundreds of Disclosure Project witnesses (currently estimated up to a 1000 according to Levenda) have not been named, a significant number have been publicly identified and their testimonies are available for research and analysis. Distorting the record of a prominent critic certainly did not help Levenda’s main goal of rebutting Greer’s criticism of DeLonge as out of his depth when it came to dealing with the Deep State.

Levenda went to great effort to stress that DeLonge had been researching the UFO field for decades, and was sufficiently familiar with the issues and main figures in the field to make good judgement calls on who’s authentic or not.

Essentially, Levenda was saying we can trust DeLonge and not see him as an inexperienced dupe, who has been taken in by the Deep State as Greer and other critics were contending.

My own knowledge in this regard is limited to an incident where Tom DeLonge got to hear the views of William Tompkins and Dr. Bob Wood regarding a secret space program, Solar Warden, established by the U.S. Navy with the aid of corporations such as Douglas Aircraft/McDonnell Douglas. Both Tompkins and Dr Wood have decades of experience with Douglas Aircraft and the aerospace industry.

DeLonge expressed his disbelief that such a thing could have happened. I know that DeLonge is not alone in disbelieving that the U.S. Navy could have secretly developed kilometers long space carriers out of its classified facilities as Tompkins contends. There is testimonial evidence that U.S. Air Force officials, have investigated Tompkins and Corey Goode’s claims in this regard as well, as I have written about here.

My book, the US Navy’s Secret Space Program and Nordic Extraterrestrial Alliance, lays out all the evidence that Solar Warden was real, and that it continues to operate in Deep Space. Perhaps DeLonge is merely reflecting the worldview of his insider sources, largely drawn from the US Air Force, who disbelieve that they would have been out of the loop on such an advanced technology program.

What the above incident does show, however, is that DeLonge has an inability to reconcile information that is contrary to what he is being told by his insiders. That’s a red flag and doesn’t help build confidence that he is not being duped by the military industrial community.

It is what Levenda had to say about the John Podesta – DeLonge link that finally shifted me from being an agnostic on the “DeLonge is an agent of the Deep State” perspective. Levenda described the Pizzagate controversy raised by Wikileaks release of thousands of Podesta emails by dismissing it as yet another example of the fear and paranoia that is so prevalent in the UFO community.

Levenda assured the audience that there’s nothing to Pizzagate and that Podesta isn’t the pedophile child sacrificing deviant that many now believe due to the Wikileaks release. In the past, I’ve written admiringly of Podesta, and also of Hillary Clinton, in their respective roles in promoting UFO disclosure dating back from the 1990’s during the Clinton Administration, right up to the 2016 Presidential campaign.

Like many in the UFO/exopolitics communities I saw them as heroes fighting the good disclosure fight, and supported them above other politicians/public figures who remained silent on the UFO issue.

All that changed with the October-November 2016 Wikileaks releases of the Podesta emails that showed coded language using pizza related words being used by Podesta, Clinton, and their associates. Investigative reporter Ben Swann and other investigators showed that this was an elaborate code used by known pedophile networks that indulged in child trafficking, and even ritual human sacrifice. The fact that many of the symbols and codes were known to law enforcement agencies merited close examination of such claims despite debunking efforts by the mainstream media such as the New York Times and Snopes.

I had earlier been made aware of the connection between child trafficking and the Washington D.C. political establishment (Deep State) through the pioneering research of John DeCamp in The Franklin Cover-up: Child Abuse, Satanism, and Murder in Nebraska and Cathy Obrien’s seminal book, Trance: Formation of America. Both of these books showed how an elaborate sex-trade in children was used to compromise young upcoming politicians, and ultimately make them agents of the Deep State as they were rapidly promoted into senior positions.

I understand that this is all very controversial, and why UFO researchers would want to steer clear of all of this. However, with the Wikileaks release of Podesta’s emails, we have someone long viewed as among the few public officials supporting UFO disclosure being directly implicated in an alleged network of child traffickers that practice many kinds of abusive rituals.

I would have understood it if Levenda had simply skirted around all this controversy and merely pointed out that DeLonge’s association with Podesta pre-dated the Wikileaks email release (they began meeting in mid-2015). This would have meant that DeLonge, along with Levenda, were simply unaware of what Podesta may have been involved in, and merely wanted to elicit his support for a UFO disclosure initiative that they were pursuing.

Tom DeLonge, Peter Levenda, and John Podesta pictured from left during a 2015 interview

However, what Levenda did instead was to offer a full-throated rebuttal of the entire Pizzagate controversy. Levenda said it was all another example of the systemic fear and paranoia that is part of the UFO community, and there was nothing of substance in the Pizzagate controversy. He even made a crude pizza joke about it all, to the stunned silence of his audience.

That is not the position an objective researcher would take when looking at all the data and evidence. The Podesta emails are a part of the public record, and in many of them he and other Clinton affiliated figures appear to be using pizza related code words and symbols recognized by law enforcement bodies as common among pedophile rings.

Levenda was not interested in seriously examining the Wikileaks email release in terms of what the use of a coded pizza words meant for Podesta and Clinton.

That’s when it finally hit me. Levenda was a Deep State agent/operative after all. His history and recruitment by the Deep State was hidden in plain sight with his account of his exploits as a precocious 17 year old which brought him into contact with CIA/Deep State operatives in an “innocent lark” involving the creation of a fake church cult.

Furthermore, who would be unscrupulous enough to use deception and a fake identity to gate crash the funeral of Bobby Kennedy who had just been assassinated after clinching the Democratic nomination for the 1968 Presidential campaign? Certainly not any normal person, but instead a future CIA agent/operative with a talent for using deception in public interactions.

Ironically, Levenda’s attempt to prove he was not a Deep State operative only succeeded in converting me from being an agnostic on the whole “DeLonge is an agent of the Deep State”  narrative, to now accepting it.

DeLonge may still be a well-meaning researcher wanting to promote UFO disclosure, but he has been coopted by Deep State operatives, including Levenda, and that is not a good foundation for any kind of genuine disclosure of the truth behind UFOs and extraterrestrial life.

© Michael E. Salla, Ph.D. Copyright Notice

Further Reading

by Hedley Burrell                Jun 10, 2018                (www.heraldtribune.com)


• Stories of UFOs have ebbed and flowed over the decades, but now there is new chatter of a different kind. Today mainstream news outlets featuring heavily credentialed experts weighing in on the ongoing UFO phenomenon. In December (2017), CNN announced: “A former Pentagon official who led a … government program to research potential UFOs said … he believes there is evidence of alien life reaching Earth.”

• The New York Post summarized events: “… The New York Times released the results of an investigation into the U.S. military’s monitoring of UFO claims and came up with… a video released by the Pentagon that shows U.S. Navy pilots tracking the movements of a totally unexplainable aircraft. Now, a local news team from Las Vegas has obtained a military report that offers even more details on the sighting and the story is somehow becoming even more bizarre than it already was.” “The report explains in great detail how a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier played a strange game of hide and seek with multiple Anomalous Aerial Vehicles (AAVs) that demonstrated flight characteristics that should be downright impossible to pull off.”

• Then there was a Washington Post story describing how a rock star had “mustered a team of credentialed experts to put mysterious incidents on your radar.” “UFOs”, the headline said, “are suddenly a serious news story.” The rock star, the Post reported, was former Blink-182 frontman Tom DeLonge, who launched To the Stars Academy of Arts & Science. It will investigate the “outer edges of science.”

• Christopher Mellon, an adviser to the academy who served as deputy assistant secretary of defense for intelligence in the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations, wrote a Washington Post opinion piece that carried this headline: “The military keeps encountering UFOs. Why doesn’t the Pentagon care?”

• What we have today are heavy-duty experts taking UFOs seriously. “My personal belief is that there is very compelling evidence that we may not be alone,” declared Luis Elizondo, the former Pentagon official in the CNN interview.

• It is intriguing to think of a new generation of journalists having to decide what attention, if any, should be given to new assertions that “the truth is out there,” to borrow a tagline from “The X-Files.”

 

Long ago, as a young reporter, I was well aware of UFO stories.

Out of curiosity, I read mainstream media pieces as well as tabloid tales. What repeatedly struck me was this: As with much else in life, we were reluctant to simply accept that we didn’t immediately know the answer to the mystery of the moment.

In any event, I would not have imagined that some six decades later, UFO stories would still be around, with heavily credentialed experts weighing in.

The stories ebbed and flowed over the decades, but now there is new chatter of a different kind.
In the past, I suspected that reports of sightings were likely to increase when popular entertainment featured space sagas, but I also thought they were a reflection of universal tensions and anxiety.

Given that these are truly tense and anxious times, I started to look around for UFO-type talk — or, rather, the reporting of same. I searched for some indication of renewed and perhaps more intense attention.

I found it, and it even had a new spin — namely an assertion that the subject was “serious.”

In December, CNN announced: “A former Pentagon official who led a … government program to research potential UFOs said … he believes there is evidence of alien life reaching Earth.” Other media outlets also weighed in. What was going on?

Last month, The New York Post summarized and updated events:
“UFO sightings are a dime a dozen … but back in December, The New York Times released the results of an investigation into the U.S. military’s monitoring of UFO claims and came up with something totally wild. It was a video released by the Pentagon that shows U.S. Navy pilots tracking the movements of a totally unexplainable aircraft. Now, a local news team from Las Vegas has obtained a military report that offers even more details on the sighting and the story is somehow becoming even more bizarre than it already was.”

The account continued: “The report explains in great details how a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier played a strange game of hide and seek with multiple Anomalous Aerial Vehicles (AAVs) that demonstrated flight characteristics that should be downright impossible to pull off.”
So there was all this.

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by Kelsey McKinney             February 27, 2018              (thefader.com)

• In the 1990’s and 2000’s, Tom DeLonge was a young guitarist, singer and songwriter for the successful rock band, Blink-182. Being a UFO enthusiast and having read hundreds of books on the subject, he occasionally made references to ETs in his songs, and even spoke with CNN’s Larry King about UFOs in 2012. In 2015, while camping in the Nevada desert near Area 51, Tom and some friends say they had a close encounter with a herd of unseen aliens that swarmed past the men huddled inside their buttoned-up tents.

• DeLonge’s public revelations about the existence of ETs and UFOs apparently caught the attention of some political and military officials. He was emailed an invitation to attend a meeting at the Pentagon in 2015. In 2016, leaked Hillary Clinton campaign emails revealed that DeLonge had been in correspondence with campaign manager John Podesta discussing the UFO phenomenon. DeLonge also published his own book on UFOs called Sekret Machines and plans to release a short film on UFOs later this year.

• In an October 2017 interview on Joe Rogan’s YouTube podcast, DeLonge stated: “The only way to get people to understand what the f*ck is going on is to first present them the story… and then follow up with the science, and then show them that the [technology] you are seeing can be engineered and created.” This appears to be what DeLong is planning to do.

• While his book is officially “fiction” and his close encounters are vague, they do reveal what DeLonge believes to be true: the Nazis were involved in the Roswell crash; the Cold War was part of a massive world-wide ET cover-up; the U.S. government is currently in possession of ET technology and actual alien beings; and intelligent ETs have been visiting the Earth for decades – even genetically tampering with the human species.

• By 2017, DeLonge had assembled $75,000 cash and an esteemed group of scientists, aerospace engineers, and former government and military officials, forming a public-benefit corporation called To The Stars Academy to explore the outer edges of science and bring to light ideas unrepresented in mainstream discourse. In addition to continuing to create books and documentaries, and encouraging further government disclosures and whistle blowers, the Academy will presumably engineer some of this advanced technology itself.

• One of the Academy’s highest profile members is Luis Elizondo, the CIA/DOD insider who ran the Pentagon’s secret UFO investigation program, as scooped by the New York Times last December. Elizondo resigned from his Pentegon position to join the Academy in October 2016 in order to give this information a better chance of becoming public. Other Academy members include esteemed physicist Dr. Hal Puthoff; Steve Justice (Lockheed Martin); Jim Semivan (CIA); and Chris Mellon (DIA).

• A 2017 survey by 20th Century Fox found that 47% of Americans believe in aliens, and 39% believe that aliens have visited earth. Since their public debut in October 2017, To The Stars Academy has raised almost $2.4 million toward their stated goal of $200M. Perhaps DeLonge’s timing is just right to create a groundswell of public interest resulting in high-level government full disclosure of UFOs and ET beings. Or perhaps not. There are those in the UFO community who believe that DeLonge is merely being used as part of a soft disclosure of limited information to the public.

 

In no particular order, here is a list of things Tom DeLonge has consistently claimed to believe: UFOs are real, aliens are real and they visit us episodically, the U.S. government has known about alien life for decades, the U.S. government has been actively experimenting with alien technologies, the Nazis were involved in Roswell, the Cold War was actually an international cover-up about extraterrestrial life, there was more to the moon landing than we were told, the mass of nuclear weapons the U.S. has is being held for a war with aliens, human evolution was tampered with by someone or something, and the U.S. government has a real live alien species locked up somewhere.

He used to sound crazy. Here was a dude in a beanie, his left arm inked from wrist to somewhere beneath his graphic tee, best known as the former co-frontman of the rock band Blink-182. In interviews, the words coming out of his mouth made less sense than the 40 “na”s strung together in the chorus of “All the Small Things.” This would have been fine — a creative mind susceptible to wild ideas is hardly unique. Except Tom DeLonge didn’t just have a passing interest or affinity; he was planning a crusade.

        Tom DeLonge of Blink-182

In late 2015, months after he announced his departure from Blink-182, Tom DeLonge began reaching out to people in politics who might be able to help him find the truth and share it with the world. Maybe no one would have known he was doing it if he hadn’t been emailing with Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager John Podesta. When her campaign email server leaked in March 2016, though, there was a bundle of emails from Tom DeLonge: sending links, asking Podesta questions about alien life, and trying to set up a meeting between Podesta and an Air Force general to discuss what really happened at Roswell.

He was also dabbling in alien fiction. Sekret Machines Book 1: Chasing Shadows, a novel, came out in April 2016. He has a young adult series called Poet Anderson, a children’s book, and both an alien-inspired album and short film slated to come out later this year. Each of these projects is meant to be grounded in the knowledge DeLonge has acquired through his years of research, like a bite-sized introduction to what he believes is the whole truth. In a YouTube interview with Joe Rogan in October 2017, he said, “The only way to get people to understand what the fuck is going on is to first present them the story […] and then follow up with the science, and then show them that the [technology] you are seeing can be engineered and created.”

So next comes the science. In October 2017, with over $75,000 cash and more than a million dollars in assets, according to SEC filings, DeLonge launched the To The Stars Academy of Arts & Sciences, comprising a group of 10 scientists, aerospace engineers, and creatives. Their aim is to explore the “outer edges of science,” bringing to light ideas unpresented by mainstream discourse, and to try to discover proof of what DeLonge already believes. They’ll also create cultural products like novels and movies to make those ideas more accessible. The plan is something like: film Star Wars, release a documentary explaining hyperdrives and lightsabers, then raise the money to somehow actually build them.

And… maybe you can? In December, two months after the launch of the To The Stars Academy, The New York Times published an article revealing a decade-long, taxpayer-funded Pentagon program that investigated UFOs without the knowledge of the American people. (The Defense Department says it closed in 2012, though some skeptics say that it’s still in existence.) Their big scoop was based off research straight from DeLonge’s foundation. Luis Elizondo, a former Pentagon employee who ran the department and became the story’s main source, was one of the first employees of To The Stars.

Former Nevada Senator Harry Reid, who greenlit the secret Pentagon program for investigating UFOs, supports DeLonge’s cause. “I think what DeLonge helped start is really wonderful,” Reid told The FADER. “I think it’s remarkable that he’s gotten this team together. They’re all scientists with deep experience.”

Suddenly, DeLonge didn’t sound like a man possessed. He sounded like a man who knew something. “I know that it’s fun to make snarky comments, but this isn’t the kind of thing to joke about,” he told the New York Daily News in December. “This is going to really affect a lot of people and a lot of people’s belief systems.” Tom DeLonge might sound crazy to you, but he’s already had one of his claims verified. And there’s no telling what else he believes that isn’t just conspiratorial rambling, but truth.

                To The Stars Academy

This is the story of how Tom DeLonge got very, very serious about aliens.

On the 1999 Blink-182 album Enema of the State, DeLonge co-wrote the song titled “Aliens Exist.” The next year, in an interview with the Los Angeles Times, he said that the track was “about aliens that come to earth and fly up your butt […] and it’s true,” hence the “enema” in the album’s title. “I’m one of those freaks that really believes that stuff exists,” he wrote in a program for the accompanying tour. “I think if anybody out there does a little bit of research they will find that they side with me.”

In 2000, his Blink-182 bandmate Mark Hoppus told Rolling Stone that Tom “believes anything he reads. You could say, ‘I read in a magazine that an alien landed in Australia. A doctor found him and did an autopsy – there’s footage on the Internet.’ And Tom wouldn’t even question it. He would take it as gospel and go around telling everybody.”

The band gave DeLonge the platform to talk about what he believed and, because he was already famous, a built-in audience. In 2011, the same year Blink released their sixth studio album, he launched his own (now-defunct) website for conspiracy theories called StrangeTimes. In 2012, he went on Larry King to discuss UFOs: “Everyone wants evidence, but no one will take testimony,” a flustered DeLonge told to a UFO skeptic. Of course he was flustered, because at that point, testimony was all he had — that is, until he met his first alien in 2015. Well, maybe heard is a better word for it.

DeLonge was traveling in the desert around Area 51 with some fellow believers filming a documentary about UFOs and government cover-ups. His tired crew drove off-road to find a good place to build a fire, set up a tent, and, hell, maybe try to reach some aliens. That night, when DeLonge awoke to “a chorus of voices — hundreds of people talking around the tent,” he already knew that aliens don’t speak like we do. “They speak on the level of consciousness,” he told George Noory on the late-night radio show Coast to Coast AM, which focuses on the paranormal. When he woke up the next morning, his experience was confirmed: a traveling companion had heard the same thing. (DeLonge denied multiple requests to comment for this piece.)

The experience in the desert affirmed his years of questioning. Years where he had read, by his own count, more than 200 books on the subject. Finally with proof, he quit Blink-182 to focus full-time on UFOs. “I can’t tour nine months out of the year with enough time to do the enormity of what I’m setting out to do,” he told Mic. He sought out Podesta and members of the intelligence community until, by his telling of it, DeLonge was inducted into a metaphorical tent of secrets by the United States government.

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