Tag: tic tac UFO

I-Team Confirms Pentagon Did Release UFO Videos

by George Knapp and Matt Adams                     April 29, 2019                       (lasvegasnow.com)

• U.S. Navy officials recently announced that it is changing its policy regarding the reporting of UFOs/UAPs by Navy pilots and personnel (see announcement article). But since a December 2017 New York Times article (see here) revealed a 5-year/$22M Pentagon UFO study program that ended in 2012, along with several videos with images of apparent UFOs, the Pentagon has insisted that the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) had nothing to do with UFOs, and it has denied that the videos came from the Department of Defense (DoD). Now, George Knapp’s ‘I-Team’ has learned that this is not accurate.

• The U.S. Navy’s 2004 encounter with a ‘Tic Tac’ UFO off of San Diego; the 2015 incursion by multiple unknowns off the coast of Florida dubbed ‘Gimbal’; and a zippy craft off of the coast of Virginia known as “Go Fast” did, in fact, come from the DoD. “The videos were released by the Department of Defense. The Department of Defense made the decision to release them,” said Lue Elizondo, a former DoD intelligence officer and director of the Pentagon’s AATIP study.

• Before Elizondo resigned from his Pentagon detail, he initiated a process to get the three videos, and many more, declassified for public release. He insisted in a June 2018 interview these UFO encounters were not isolated incidents. “There were many incidents we looked at and we looked at them on a continuing basis,” said former US Senator Harry Reid. Senator Reid confirmed ‘there’s a lot more where these came from’.

• To back up their assertions, the I-Team obtained a copy of the DD 1910 form issued by the Department of Defense office of prepublication and security review, the final step in a multi-step process to have them publicly released. (click here for the DD 1910 form) The request specifies the three videos: Go Fast, Gimbal and FLIR, which was the original name for the Tic Tac encounter. The document shows that authorization for release was granted on August 24, 2017. The I-Team also acquired the DoD directive which spells out how the video release procedure works.

• Since their release, the three videos and the pilots involved in those encounters have been part of several closed door briefings given to Congress, set up by Chris Mellon who formerly worked for the Senate Intelligence Committee and the Department of Defense. High ranking Navy officials claimed to be ‘just as surprised’ at the UFO evidence as congressional staff. The Navy now wants to encourage pilots to report unusual encounters without fear of damaging their careers.

• Mellon, now of ‘To The Stars Academy’, told the I-Team that the Navy officials realized it was “indefensible” to not have a system that allowed more reporting of these incidents.

 

U.S. Navy officials issued a stunning statement a few days ago. The Navy announced it is developing new policies that will make it easier for pilots and other military personnel to file official reports about encounters with “unexplained aerial phenomena”, otherwise known as UFOs.

What’s behind this dramatic announcement? And is it related to the UFO videos which were made public at the end of 2017?

For the U.S. Navy to issue such a forceful statement about UFOs and the importance of investigating each incident is such an abrupt change. It stands in marked contrast to all the conflicting statements made by the Pentagon in the past 15 months — claims that the secret study sponsored by Nevada Senator Harry Reid wasn’t really about UFOs, that it ended years ago, and that the three videos weren’t really released by the Department of Defense. Suffice to say, those Pentagon statements are simply not accurate.

The U.S. Navy’s 2004 encounter with an object dubbed the Tic Tac UFO. The 2015 incursion by multiple unknowns off the coast of Florida dubbed Gimbal. And a zippy craft aptly known as “Go Fast”.

Two of the three videos were made public in December 2017, released simultaneously by the New York Times and To The Stars Academy. The provenance of the videos has been disputed ever since.

“The videos were released by the Department of Defense. The Department of Defense made the decision to release them,” said Lue Elizondo, a former intelligence officer.

Reporter George Knapp: “So, someone gave this the green light?”

Lue Elizondo: “Absolutely, and it wasn’t me.”

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The US Navy Secretly Designed a Super-Fast Futuristic Aircraft Resembling a UFO, Documents Reveal

by Jasper Hamill                  April 18, 2019                     (metro.co.uk)

• The US Navy applied for three patents in 2016. One of them was for a “craft using an inertial mass reduction device”, and it was granted last year. US Navy scientist Salvatore Cezar Pais filed the patent. The theoretical craft would use an ‘inertial mass reduction device’ generating artificial gravity waves. With this reduction in mass, it thereby lessens the object’s resistance to motion, or ‘inertia’, and is able to travel at a much greater velocity in water, air or even space.

• ‘It is possible to reduce the inertial mass and hence the gravitational mass, of a system/object in motion, by an abrupt perturbation of the non-linear background of local space-time,’ the patent states. ‘This hybrid craft would move with great ease through the air/space/water mediums, by being enclosed in a vacuum plasma bubble/sheath.’

• The craft described in the patent features a cavity wall filled with gas, which is then made to vibrate using powerful electromagnetic waves. This then creates a vacuum around the craft, allowing it to propel itself at high speeds.

• Earlier this year, it was revealed that US government researchers investigated wormholes, antigravity, invisibility cloaking, warp drives and high energy laser weapons during an official but covert probe into ‘unexplained aerial phenomena’ called the Advanced Aerospace Threat and Identification Program (AATIP). The program allegedly ended in 2012. Details of AATIP were first released in 2017.

• Nick Pope, former UFO investigator at the Ministry of Defence, noted that this patented design was “uncannily similar” to the ‘tic tac UFO’ that was reported by Navy jet pilots from the USS Nimitz off of the coast of San Diego in 2004. The pilots saw a huge patch of churning, turbulent water suggesting something was beneath the surface, and then a tic tac UFO that accelerated at an ‘impossibly’ high speed. Pope also said that a similar incident of a UFO flying underwater occurred in Puerto Rico in 2013. “It’s possible that the patent is inspired by the incident and is part of an attempt to work out the technology behind the objects that were chased by the Navy F-18s. This is known as ‘reverse-engineering’,” says Pope.

• The Navy patent also mentions Dr. Harold Puthoff, a key figure in AATIP who commissioned the 38 papers exploring exotic propulsion system technologies, which were used in Defense Intelligence Agency briefings filed with the US Congress. This is the type of “technology that we’d need for interstellar travel,” Pope added. “These patents might be the first steps in taking humankind to the stars.”

• Another Navy patent was for a “high-frequency gravitational wave generator”. “If they have built the technology described in the patents, I’m sure the program is highly classified,” said Pope. “The bottom line is that if any of this works, we’re in game-changing territory.”

• Although the US Navy applied for the patent in 2016 and it was granted last year, it doesn’t necessarily mean the craft has been built and tested. However, the technology is further evidence of the military’s interest in developing ‘exotic’ technologies.

 

Military inventors filed plans for a highly unusual flying machine which uses an ‘inertial mass reduction device’ to travel at ‘extreme speeds’. What that means is that the aircraft uses complex technology to reduce its mass and thereby lessen inertia (an object’s resistance to motion) so it can zoom along at high velocities. The patent is highly complex and describes methods of reducing the mass of an aircraft using various techniques including the generation of gravity waves, which were first detected in 2016 after being produced when two black holes collided.

‘It is possible to reduce the inertial mass and hence the gravitational mass, of a system/object in motion, by an abrupt perturbation of the non-linear background of local spacetime,’ the patent says. The craft described in the patent features a cavity wall filled with gas, which is then made to vibrate using powerful electromagnetic waves. This then creates a vacuum around the craft, allowing it to propel itself at high speeds. The UFO-style ship can be used in water, air or even space. ‘It is possible to envision a hybrid aerospace/undersea craft (HAUC), which due to the physical mechanisms enabled with the inertial mass reduction device, can function as a submersible craft capable of extreme underwater speeds… and enhanced stealth capabilities,’ the patent continues. ‘This hybrid craft would move with great ease through the air/space/water mediums, by being enclosed in a vacuum plasma bubble/sheath.’ Although the US Navy applied for the patent in 2016 and it was granted last year, it doesn’t necessarily mean the craft has been built and tested. However, the technology is further evidence of the military’s interest in developing ‘exotic’ technologies.

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The UFO Community Still Believes — and Science is Starting to Listen

by Chabeli Herrera                March 19, 2019                   (orlandosentinel.com)

• Over the past two years, scientists, politicians and professionals have increasingly been willing to touch the taboo subject of UFOs and perhaps lend a little credence to those who still believe.

• In December 2017, the New York Times reported that the U.S. had funded a secret, $22 million project to study UFO claims from 2007 to 2012. Declassified video taken in 2004 by two Navy F/A-18F fighter jets off the coast of San Diego showed a craft with no apparent propulsion moving at alarmingly fast speeds. Navy pilot Commander David Fravor who witnessed the Tic Tac-shaped craft told the Washington Post that it was “something not from Earth.”

• Harvard’s astronomy department chair, Avi Loeb, along with colleague Shmuel Bialy, wrote in a publication in Astrophysical Journal Letters that an interstellar object seen passing through our solar system called Oumuamua “is a lightsail, flowing in interstellar space as a debris from an advanced technological equipment.” Loeb theorized that, “Oumuamua may be a fully operational probe sent intentionally to Earth vicinity by an alien civilization.”

• NASA’s Ames Research Center scientist Silvano Colombano went on record recently to suggest that NASA and the scientific community should be more open-minded in its approach to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. NASA is preoccupied with finding biosignatures through its Center for Life Detection Science than interested in analyzing alleged UFO sightings.

• MUFON (Mutual UFO Network) does analyze UFO sightings. It has 3,500 members in 42 countries. Barbara Stusse, 80, has been coming to MUFON meetings for three years. She says that her mother saw a UFO in 1947. In 1965, she read about Betty and Barney Hill and “believed it”.

• Kathleen Marden is MUFON’s director of experiencer research. She was 13 years old in September 1961 when her Aunt Betty Hill and her Uncle Barney Hill saw a UFO in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. There were two hours they couldn’t account for, and Barney was sure he’d seen eight to eleven figures dressed in black shiny uniforms that were “somehow not human”. Under hypnosis, the Hills related how they were abducted and physically examined inside the UFO. “They examined their hands, they took their shoes off, they examined their feet, they did tests on them that appear to be testing their nervous systems, as well,” says Marden. She has written about the government’s ‘tampering’ with the Hill case. But lately Marden has seen a recent shift in the credence that people give to the UFO phenomenon, with the 2017 New York Times article being the turning point.

• Trish Bishop of Kissimmee, Florida, relates her story of March 2013 at dusk when she saw a tall, muscular man wearing a formfitting tan colored uniform, boots and gloves was lingering in her backyard at the edge of a forest. But his face wasn’t human. His eyes bulged far out of their sockets. His jaw was over-sized. And his skin was white as chalk. Paralyzed with fear, she pretended not to watch the man while she called for help on her phone. Then man appeared to be climbing invisible steps. When he was about 10 feet off the ground, he turned his back to her and pulled himself up “into a UFO?” she thought — and he was gone. After four years, she got the nerve to report the incident to MUFON.

• The challenge with UFO and alien sightings has always been the lack of evidence. Bishop said she was too scared to take a photo of her alien. Little to no consequential evidence exists in other cases. University of Central Florida psychology professor Alvin Wang thinks that people project their predisposition to believe in conspiracy theories, and seek out others who reaffirm that belief. “[T]hey get …confirmation support, when they are members of UFO believers community,” said Wang.

 

He appeared as if a hologram at first — then solid — suddenly there and clear as you or I, at the edge of the forest behind Trish Bishop’s home in Kissimmee.

It was a Thursday in March 2013, the glow of the afternoon tucking in for the day behind the trees. He stood tall, at least 6-foot-3, perhaps 220 pounds and certainly muscular, wearing a formfitting tan colored uniform, boots and gloves. He lingered by the crape myrtle tree in the middle of the backyard.

When he turned around, it was his face, she remembers, that stopped her.

Bulging eyes jutting so far out of the sockets that Bishop wondered whether he could close them. Skin white as chalk.
And a jaw so large, it dispelled any notions the government worker had of the visitor being human.

“If you compare a human jawbone to his, we would be a chihuahua to a pit bull,” Bishop said.

Paralyzed with fear, she watched as what she believed to be an alien appeared to climb invisible steps, stopping often to snatch glances at her from where she sat on her back porch, fumbling with her phone to appear as though she couldn’t see him.

Her finger was pressed on the number “9” to dial for help.

When he was about 10 feet off the ground, he turned his back to her and pulled himself up — “into a UFO?” she thought — and was gone.

Bishop sat stunned. “I’ve got a freaking alien in my backyard,” she thought.

It would be four years before she told anyone her story, before she’d discover the Mutual Unidentified Flying Objects Network, a nationwide organization 50 years old, and file her report under case number 84886 with the local Florida chapter.

But she worried: Who would believe her?

These days, more people than you’d think.

Across restaurants and meeting rooms in the United States, MUFON groups still gather every month to discuss cases like Bishop’s with the enthusiasm that once gripped the nation during the Cold War, when UFO sightings still made a splash on the front page.

The Space Coast group, made up of some former NASA employees and engineers, has 118 members, the largest in the state. Across the U.S. they number 3,500, with additional offices in 42 countries.

For many years, they were alone entertaining UFO theories. No more.

In the past two years, scientists, politicians and professionals have increasingly been willing to touch the taboo subject and perhaps lend a little credence to those who still believe.

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