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Project Blue Book Episode 4 Review: Operation Paperclip

Alejandro Rojas                  January 30, 2019                          (denofgeek.com)

• Episode 4 of the History Channel series, Project Blue Book, is entitled “Operation Paperclip” and delves into the events in Huntsville, Alabama in the late 1950’s, when the former Nazi rocket scientist, Wernher von Braun, was heading up the US military’s development of its own rocket weaponry. The show’s protagonist, J Allen Hynek, is led to Huntsville after he sees a UFO darting around his commercial airplane and his partner, Air Force Captain Michael Quinn, feels certain that it was a rocket from the Huntsville base. While there, they are introduced to Von Braun and other Germans that were brought here under Operation Paperclip to assimilate into American society and work on the rocket program. They see a humanoid alien floating on a vat of liquid, and a UFO or replica that disappears when a force-field is activated around it.

• Operation Paperclip was real, and Wernher von Braun was a real rocket scientist brought to the U.S. The German rocket scientists were first brought to Fort Bliss, Texas, but in the ‘50s, von Braun and his team were moved to Huntsville, Alabama. The Americans wanted the Germans to create the world’s first ballistic missiles for them.

• During WWII, the Nazi’s communicated with aliens (Draco Reptilians) and were able to develop technologies based on alien technology. There are pictures online of saucer-shaped craft with Nazi symbols and guns mounted on them, although firing the weapons disrupted the propulsion systems and would not work. The Germans were able to develop rudimentary anti-gravity propulsion with a “Nazi Bell” craft. The propulsion system consisted of two cylinders filled with a mercury-like substance that spun in opposite directions.

• In 1943, the USS Eldridge, a 300 ft long Navy destroyer, was used to experiment with cloaking technology. When the invisibility machine was enabled, the ship disappeared. When it reappeared crewmen reported feeling sick, and some were killed by somehow being embedded into the bulkhead of the vessel. Known as “The Philadelphia Experiment”, this is the technology alluded to in this episode of Operation Blue Book when the prototype spaceship disappears at the end of the show.

• This Project Blue Book episode seems to suggest UFO sightings are actually due to civilian sightings of our own experimental aircraft, or in this case, experimental rockets. This is a ruse that the CIA has often used. The problem is that the U.S. Air Force began investigating UFO sightings in 1947 with Project Sign and Project Blue Book began in 1952. The U.S. did not conduct test flights of the U-2 spy plane until the mid to late 50s. So it is not possible for the U-2 test flights to have been the UFOs that caused the creation of Project Blue Book.

Project Blue Book, the TV show, is getting more exciting. This particular journey into conspiratorial sci-fi is intelligent in that it is expertly incorporating the UFO and conspiracy mythologies while making the viewers think about alternate explanations to the UFO mystery.

 

Project Blue Book episode 4 takes a nosedive into the rabbit hole, but the wild storylines follow real conspiracy and UFO mythologies that are popular on the web. It also presents an intriguing alternate theory to the idea that UFOs have anything to do with aliens at all.

   the real Wernher von Braun

Take an odd part of history, add a bit of conspiracy mythology, then sprinkle with magic Hollywood dust and up sprouts a huge, beautiful tree of fantasy. That would sum up my feelings on “Operation Paperclip.” I am a student of history, so I relish in historical accuracy. However, I am also a sci-fi buff, and this latest episode frustrated the history buff in me while exciting my sci-fi side.

Let’s get into it. The show begins with Hynek on an airplane. The first mystery presented was that the passenger cabin of the aircraft looked more like a train with curtains over the windows and seats that faced one another. However, in a tweet, show creator and writer David O’Leary wrote: “Yes, these old 1950s planes really did have train-like booths that faced each other. And lots more leg room!” Score one for historical accuracy! Granted, it’s one of the few points that I will award in this category for this particular episode.

Hynek then sees a UFO flying around the airplane. We are lead to believe Hynek is experiencing this sighting, but then he wakes from a dream. He was dreaming about his most recent UFO case – a sighting by the passengers and crew of a commercial aircraft near Huntsville, Alabama.

          the real J. Allen Hynek

Quinn feels certain he knows who is responsible for this UFO incident and he is not very happy about it. Quinn explains that after World War II, German scientists were snatched up by the U.S. as part of Operation Paperclip. He says Huntsville was set up to house German scientists working on rocket technology, led by Wernher von Braun. Having fought in World War II, Quinn is with the situation.

Hynek and Quinn travel to Huntsville to find out what the Germans are up to. Quinn is convinced that the UFO that buzzed the airplane was a rocket built by the former German scientists, who he believes were not concerned with endangering the lives of the passengers.

Security denies Hynek and Quinn access to the base, but Quinn crashes through the barricades anyway. This does allow them an audience with Von Braun but also lands Quinn a suspension. Von Braun says he is familiar with Hynek’s work, shows them a secret rocket launch and offers Hynek a job. He admits it was one of his rockets that buzzed the airplane, but Hynek doesn’t believe him.

To make a long story short, after leaving, Hyenk and Quinn break into the base again. This time they sneak around and find a body floating in a suspended animation container. It looks like an alien. The base alarms sound, so the two race off, only to be caught. Von Braun tells them what they saw was a monkey that had been sent into space and was undergoing testing as to the effects of space on its body. Hynek tells him he is suspicious of their project because the rocket explanation for the UFO sighting did not fit the witness testimony. There is something von Braun is hiding.

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Invisible Sailors and a Bar-Room Brawl

by Nick Redfern           January 24, 2018              (mysteriousuniverse.org)

  • The infamous The Philadelphia Experiment” came from a man named Carlos Allende who claimed that, in 1943, the Navy was doing (cloaking) experiments based on Einstein’s Unified Field Theory, and accidentally transported the Navy ship, the USS Eldridge, from the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard to a Norfolk shipyard, and back again. Allende claims that while he was in the Navy during WWII he witnessed several such experiments. The Navy didn’t deny these experiments.

  • An investigator named Bill Moore claims to have seen a newspaper article about an occurrence that happened at the same time. There was a brawl involving sailors at a local bar. The Navy Shore Patrol arrived to break it up. When local police arrived to back up the Shore Patrol, the bar was empty. A waitress told the police that two of the sailors in the brawl had simply disappeared in the bar. “They just sort of vanished into thin air… right there,” reported a frightened hostess, “and I ain’t been drinking either!”

  • Six years later, an unassociated Navy man was told the story of a “bunch of sailors” who had mysteriously vanished from a bar somewhere near the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. But this occurred prior to the ‘Philadelphia Experiment’s’ public disclosure in the mid-1950’s.

  • [Editor’s Note]  There is a lot more to the story. The sailors aboard the USS Eldridge were disoriented and some were encapsulated in the bulkhead of the ship due to shifting time-space. A time-space window would cause further anomalies at twenty-year intervals. Two of the Eldridge sailors were brothers Duncan and Ed Cameron. Ed changed his name to Al Bielek and claimed to have time-traveld on several occasions as a result of this incident. Bielek died in 2011. Duncan Cameron remains a prominent figure in the disclosure movement.

 

Just like the Roswell saga of 1947, the 1967 Patterson-Gimlin film of a Bigfoot (or of a man in a suit, depending on your opinion), and the theory that the Moon-landings were faked, just about everyone has heard of what has become infamously known as “The Philadelphia Experiment.”

According to the wild claims of a man named Carlos Allende (told to writer Morris K. Jessup in the mid-1950s) in 1943, and during a classified project, a ship was made invisible and teleported from the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard to Norfolk, Virginia. And back again. It was all said to have been an outgrowth of Albert Einstein’s Unified Field Theory. Allende claimed the ship in question was the DE 173 USS Eldridge. Allende didn’t stop there: he said he saw one of several such experiments from the safety of his own ship, the SS Andrew Furuseth. Few researchers today have much time for Allende’s stories.

No one disputes that something led to the creation of the legend of the vanishing ship and its crew. Indeed, even the U.S. Navy admits that some of its wartime experiments may have provoked a number of the rumors. There is one aspect of the story that often pops up in conversations of the Philadelphia Experiment kind, mainly because it’s so entertainingly weird.

                        USS Eldridge

Investigator Bill Moore (who, in 1979 and with Charles Berlitz, wrote The Philadelphia Experiment) revealed a strange story extracted from a newspaper that has still yet to be identified. It described the sudden vanishing – and I do mean vanishing, as in here one second and gone the next – of a number of sailors in a local pub.

With the eye-catching headline of “Strange Circumstances Surround Tavern Brawl,” the story went as follows:
“Several city police officers responding to a call to aid members of the Navy Shore Patrol in breaking up a tavern brawl near the U.S. Navy docks here last night got something of a surprise when they arrived on the scene to find the place empty of customers. According to a pair of very nervous waitresses, the Shore Patrol had arrived first and cleared the place out -but not before two of the sailors involved allegedly did a disappearing act. ‘They just sort of vanished into thin air… right there,’ reported one of the frightened hostesses, ‘and I ain’t been drinking either!’ At that point, according to her account, the Shore Patrol proceeded to hustle everybody out of the place in short order.”

The story continued: “A subsequent chat with the local police precinct left no doubts as to the fact that some sort of general brawl had indeed occurred in the vicinity of the dockyards at about eleven o’clock last night, but neither confirmation nor denial of the stranger aspects of the story could be immediately obtained. One reported witness succinctly summed up the affair by dismissing it as nothing more than ‘a lot of hooey from them daffy dames down there,’ who, he went on to say, were probably just looking for some free publicity. Damage to the tavern was estimated to be in the vicinity of six hundred dollars.”

Moore and Berlitz’s assessment was that: “Little else can be said about the clipping itself. Anything approaching a proper analysis of the clipping is impossible, since the authors possess a photocopy only. Upon close examination, however, the possibly significant fact emerges that the column width is a bit greater than was used by any of the Philadelphia dailies in the 1940s. This suggests that the article may have originated in a local or regional newspaper in the Philadelphia area rather than in one of the metropolitan papers.”

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