• Home
  • The New York Times

Tag: The New York Times

I-Team: Race Is On to Solve the Mystery of Unknown Materials

by George Knapp and Matt Adams                October 31, 2018                     (lasvegasnow.com)

• For years, the Pentagon has secretly studied the seemingly impossible abilities of unknown craft captured in military videos. Scientists now want to know if the materials used in these UFOs allow them to do what they do. They’ve been collecting so-called “metamaterials”, especially any associated with crashed UFOs, from all over the world.

• Many material samples come through Tom DeLonge’s ‘To The Stars Academy’s “A.D.A.M.” Research Project. “We have multiple samples from multiple sources, a wide range of variety and integrity,” says Luis Elizondo.
|
• One of the secret studies was carried out by BAASS (Bigelow Aerospace Advanced Space Studies), a Las Vegas operation hidden within Bigelow Aerospace, under contract with the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) to study metamaterials as well as futuristic technologies. Last year, the New York Times reported that a sample of metamaterial was secretly stored at Bigelow aerospace. Managers of the BAASS program told George Knapp’s “I-Team” news team in Las Vegas that while they are familiar with some of the metamaterial samples, none were ever stored in Las Vegas.

• A type of metamaterial studied by Dr. Hal Puthoff with the Institute for Advanced Studies (in Austin, TX) was “… a multilayered bismuth and magnesium sample. Bismuth layers less than a human hair. Magnesium samples about 10 times the size of a human hair, supposedly picked up in the crash retrieval of an advanced aerospace vehicle. It looks like it’s been in a crash.” Puthoff and his colleague Dr. Eric Davis are on the cutting edge of attempts to identify an assortment of bits and pieces that are seemingly beyond anything we can create.

• Astrophysicist Dr. Jacques Vallee has been analyzing metamaterials since the 80s, often using the technical expertise of Stanford University and Silicon Valley to unravel unknown samples acquired from all over the world. Vallee pointedly steers clear of any military funding and he’s shared his findings at public conferences.

 

LAS VEGAS – A global scramble is underway to identify and perhaps replicate unidentified mystery materials that have been collected at multiple sites around the world.

A few of the samples have defied analysis by leading scientists, who say they don’t know how the material was engineered, or why, or by whom?

Some of the metamaterial was allegedly collected in connection with UFO incidents, which gives the whole endeavor an otherworldly glow.

For years, the Pentagon secretly studied the seemingly impossible abilities of unknown craft captured in military videos.

Scientists now want to know if the materials used in these mystery aircraft allow them to do what they do. For years, one of the secret studies was carried out by BAASS (Bigelow Aerospace Advanced Space Studies), a Las Vegas operation hidden within Bigelow Aerospace.

Documents first reported by the I-Team show that BAASS landed a contract with the DIA (Defense Intelligence Agency), and one of the objectives was to study so called metamaterials, as well as futuristic technologies.

“It was a multilayered bismuth and magnesium sample. Bismuth layers less than a human hair. Magnesium samples about 10 times the size of a human hair, supposedly picked up in the crash retrieval of an advanced aerospace vehicle. It looks like it’s been in a crash,” said Dr. Hal Puthoff, with the Institute for Advanced Studies during a presentation in Las Vegas.

In June, physicist Hal Puthoff came pretty close to saying that the weird wedge of metamaterial came from a crashed saucer, but he can’t know for sure. Puthoff and his colleague Dr. Eric Davis are on the cutting edge of attempts to identify an assortment of bits and pieces that are seemingly beyond anything we can create.

This one sample is engineered in layers thinner than microns, through a process unknown on earth, and for a purpose we can only guess.

“Nowhere could we find any evidence that anybody ever made one of these when we talked to people in the materials field who should know, they said we don’t know why anybody would want to make anything like this,” Dr. Puthoff said.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

How U.F.O.s ‘Exploded’ Into Public View

by Laura M. Holson                   August 3, 2018                      (nytimes.com)

• Starting around 11:40 p.m. on July 19, 1952, air traffic controllers at Washington National Airport noticed radar blips speeding near Andrews Air Force Base. The unidentified aircrafts fanned out, flying over the White House and the U.S. Capitol (see photo image above). They vanished around 5 a.m. That morning, Capt. S.C. “Casey” Pierman was leaving Washington National Airport bound for Detroit. Air traffic control told Pierman to follow the unidentified flying objects. Flying over West Virginia, Pierman reported tracking as many as seven bluish-white lights.

• A week later on July 26th, unidentified radar blips were again spotted on radar at Washington National Airport. The Air Force dispatched jet fighters to intercept the flying objects. But every time one of the jets closed in, they disappeared. When the jets backed off, they reappeared. At one point, a pilot found himself in the midst of four unidentified aircrafts and asked what to do. Air control were speechless. Suddenly the objects began to move away. The pilot radioed, ‘They’re gone,” and returned to his base.

• Pentagon spokesman at the time, Albert Chop, told the press that “These things hung around all night long.” The next day, almost every major newspaper wrote about the UFOs. “‘Objects’ Outstrip Jets Over Capital,” was the headline in The New York Times.

• The Air Force and the CIA became worried that the Soviet Union would take advantage of the situation and launch an attack on the United States. Worse, no one could explain the phenomenon to President Harry Truman.

• On July 29, 1952, Maj. Gen. John Samford, the director of Air Force intelligence overseeing the inquiry, held a news conference to reassure the public. He dismissed the Washington sightings as a temperature anomaly. Still, the general conceded that not all the details could be explained by natural causes. Witness reports “have been made by credible observers of relatively incredible things,” he said at the time. The New York Times ran the headline “Air Force Debunks ‘Saucers’ as Just ‘Natural Phenomena.’”

• In January 1953, a scientific committee led by Howard Robertson, a well-known mathematician and physicist, was formed by the government to explore the phenomenon. “One of the conclusions was that they needed to debunk UFOs,” said former Army Lt Col. Kevin Randle, who has written a book on the incident, Invasion Washington: U.F.O.s Over the Capitol. The ‘Robertson Panel’ suggested that the government conduct a mass media education campaign to “reduce the current gullibility of the public and consequently their susceptibility to clever hostile propaganda.” The re-education campaign did not work. Few were convinced by the government’s explanation, and UFOs have persisted in pop culture.

• Government officials have sought to publicly debunk the existence of alien evidence ever since the 1952 Washington sightings. Nevertheless, the topic is back in the headlines. Last year, The New York Times wrote about a little known Pentagon project, the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, founded in 2007 to investigate UFO sightings. A search of The NY Times’s historical archives reveals a rich bounty of UFO sightings, lore and explanations since the 1950s. And who can forget in 2016 when Hillary Clinton said she would reopen the real X-files if she were president?

[Editor’s Note]  According to sources such as Corey Goode and William Tompkins, the UFOs that buzzed Washington D.C. in the summer of 1952 were actually Nazi spacecraft from Antarctica.  After these incidents, President Eisenhower and the U.S. military were pressured into negotiating a truce with the Nazi faction, ultimately clearing the way for a cooperative treaty between the highly advanced Nazi group and the U.S. military industrial complex which endures even today. 

 

In the early morning of July 20, 1952, Capt. S.C. “Casey” Pierman was ready for takeoff at Washington National Airport, when a bright light skimmed the horizon and disappeared. He did not think much of it until he was airborne, bound for Detroit, and an air traffic controller told him two or three unidentified flying objects were spotted on radar traveling at high speed.

The controller told Captain Pierman to follow them, the pilot told government investigators at the time. Captain Pierman agreed, and headed northwest over West Virginia where he saw as many as seven bluish-white lights that looked “like falling stars without tails,” according to a newspaper report.

The sighting of whatever-they-were garnered headlines around the world. And in the decades since, U.F.O.s have become part of the pop culture zeitgeist, from “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” to “The X-Files.” In September, a star of that long-running series, Gillian Anderson, will appear in “UFO,” a movie about a college student haunted by sightings of flying saucers. A “Men in Black” remake is in the works. And the History Channel plans to air “Project Blue Book,” a scripted series about the government program that studied whether U.F.O.s were a national threat.

And the topic is back in the headlines. Last year, The Times wrote about a little known project founded in 2007, the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, to investigate U.F.O. sightings. A search of The Times’s historical archives reveals a rich bounty of U.F.O. sightings, lore and explanations since the 1950s. And who can forget in 2016 when Hillary Clinton said she would reopen the real X-files if she were president?

Captain Pierman’s 68-year-old daughter, Faith McClory, said in an interview last month that her father became something of a celebrity as reports like his in the summer of 1952 fueled fear of a space alien invasion.

“My sister has memories of men coming to our home,” said Ms. McClory, who grew up in Belleville, Mich. (She said they were reporters.) “People were enthralled with the flying saucers,” she added.
Researchers say government officials have sought to publicly debunk the existence of alien evidence ever since the Washington sightings.

“Unidentified flying objects exploded into the public consciousness then,” said Mark Rodeghier, the scientific director for the Center for UFO Studies, a group of scientists and researchers who study the U.F.O. phenomenon. “There was concern in a way you hadn’t seen before.”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

In This Time of Tension and Anxiety, UFOs Are Back in the News

by Hedley Burrell                Jun 10, 2018                (www.heraldtribune.com)


• Stories of UFOs have ebbed and flowed over the decades, but now there is new chatter of a different kind. Today mainstream news outlets featuring heavily credentialed experts weighing in on the ongoing UFO phenomenon. In December (2017), CNN announced: “A former Pentagon official who led a … government program to research potential UFOs said … he believes there is evidence of alien life reaching Earth.”

• The New York Post summarized events: “… The New York Times released the results of an investigation into the U.S. military’s monitoring of UFO claims and came up with… a video released by the Pentagon that shows U.S. Navy pilots tracking the movements of a totally unexplainable aircraft. Now, a local news team from Las Vegas has obtained a military report that offers even more details on the sighting and the story is somehow becoming even more bizarre than it already was.” “The report explains in great detail how a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier played a strange game of hide and seek with multiple Anomalous Aerial Vehicles (AAVs) that demonstrated flight characteristics that should be downright impossible to pull off.”

• Then there was a Washington Post story describing how a rock star had “mustered a team of credentialed experts to put mysterious incidents on your radar.” “UFOs”, the headline said, “are suddenly a serious news story.” The rock star, the Post reported, was former Blink-182 frontman Tom DeLonge, who launched To the Stars Academy of Arts & Science. It will investigate the “outer edges of science.”

• Christopher Mellon, an adviser to the academy who served as deputy assistant secretary of defense for intelligence in the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations, wrote a Washington Post opinion piece that carried this headline: “The military keeps encountering UFOs. Why doesn’t the Pentagon care?”

• What we have today are heavy-duty experts taking UFOs seriously. “My personal belief is that there is very compelling evidence that we may not be alone,” declared Luis Elizondo, the former Pentagon official in the CNN interview.

• It is intriguing to think of a new generation of journalists having to decide what attention, if any, should be given to new assertions that “the truth is out there,” to borrow a tagline from “The X-Files.”

 

Long ago, as a young reporter, I was well aware of UFO stories.

Out of curiosity, I read mainstream media pieces as well as tabloid tales. What repeatedly struck me was this: As with much else in life, we were reluctant to simply accept that we didn’t immediately know the answer to the mystery of the moment.

In any event, I would not have imagined that some six decades later, UFO stories would still be around, with heavily credentialed experts weighing in.

The stories ebbed and flowed over the decades, but now there is new chatter of a different kind.
In the past, I suspected that reports of sightings were likely to increase when popular entertainment featured space sagas, but I also thought they were a reflection of universal tensions and anxiety.

Given that these are truly tense and anxious times, I started to look around for UFO-type talk — or, rather, the reporting of same. I searched for some indication of renewed and perhaps more intense attention.

I found it, and it even had a new spin — namely an assertion that the subject was “serious.”

In December, CNN announced: “A former Pentagon official who led a … government program to research potential UFOs said … he believes there is evidence of alien life reaching Earth.” Other media outlets also weighed in. What was going on?

Last month, The New York Post summarized and updated events:
“UFO sightings are a dime a dozen … but back in December, The New York Times released the results of an investigation into the U.S. military’s monitoring of UFO claims and came up with something totally wild. It was a video released by the Pentagon that shows U.S. Navy pilots tracking the movements of a totally unexplainable aircraft. Now, a local news team from Las Vegas has obtained a military report that offers even more details on the sighting and the story is somehow becoming even more bizarre than it already was.”

The account continued: “The report explains in great details how a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier played a strange game of hide and seek with multiple Anomalous Aerial Vehicles (AAVs) that demonstrated flight characteristics that should be downright impossible to pull off.”
So there was all this.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

  • 1
  • 2

Copyright © 2018 Exopolitics Institute News Service. All Rights Reserved.