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Do Aliens Exist? Blink 182 Co-Founder and Ex-Pentagon Official Are Determined to Prove We’re Not Alone

by Keith Kloor                    September 20, 2018                       (newsweek.com)

• On July 29th, Luis Elizondo, the former career military intelligence official in charge of the Pentagon’s UFO research program from 2007 to 2012 and current member of rock star Tom DeLonge’s ‘To The Stars Academy’, spoke at the annual Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) Symposium at the Crowne Plaza hotel in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

• Elizondo’s background is typical of a straight-arrow military officer with a distinguished career. He is the son of a Cuban exile who participated in the Bay of Pigs in 1961. Elizondo worked as a bouncer while attending the University of Miami. After graduating in 1995, he joined the Army and trained to be a military spy. Later, at the Pentagon, Elizondo showed no sign of being a disgruntled employee, spending much of his career chasing militants in South America and the Middle East.

• In 2010, Elizondo was made the head of a small group within the Pentagon charged with investigating reports of “unexplained aerial phenomena” – a less controversial term for UFOs. It was an ¬obscure, low-budget initiative created in 2007 at the behest of then-Senator Harry Reid of Nevada, and operated jointly by Elizondo and Robert Bigelow of Bigelow Aerospace. But the results of their UFO investigations made Elizondo a true believer. Although the Pentagon program was officially shut down in 2012, Elizondo insists it remains ongoing.

• Elizondo resigned from the Pentagon in October 2017 protesting what he considered lackluster support and unnecessary secrecy. “Why aren’t we spending more time and effort on this (UFO) issue?” Elizondo wrote to Defense Secretary James Mattis in his resignation letter, “Despite overwhelming evidence at both the classified and unclassified levels, certain individuals in the Department (of Defense) remain staunchly opposed to further research on what could be a tactical threat to our pilots, sailors, and soldiers, and perhaps even an existential threat to our national security.”

• When Tom DeLonge launched ‘To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science’ in October 2017, Elizondo joined and quickly became its public face. Its mission: to advance UFO research, produce science-fiction-themed entertainment about UFOs and, with luck, glean some insight into the super-advanced technology displayed by UFOs (such as spaceships that can seemingly defy gravity) that the Pentagon keeps ignoring. Over the past year, the Academy claims to have attracted more than 2,000 investors and raised roughly $2.5 million.

• ‘To The Stars Academy’ also boasts such heavy-hitters as Chris Mellon, the former deputy ¬assistant secretary of defense for intelligence during the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations who had oversight of the Pentagon’s super-¬secret ‘special access programs’ and highly classified ‘black operations’; Jim Semivan, a 25-year veteran of the CIA’s National Clandestine Service; and Hal Puthoff an electrical engineer who conducted controversial research on psychic abilities for the CIA and the DIA.

• The $22 million Pentagon UFO project marked the first time that the U.S. government admitted to studying UFOs since the Air Force’s ‘Project Blue Book’ was shut down in 1968. Despite Senator Reid’s assertion in an interview with New York magazine that “we have hundreds and ¬hundreds of papers… 80 percent at least, is public,” and Mellon’s statement in Washington Post op-ed, that referred to a “growing body of empirical data,” Elizondo says that much of these “large volumes” of academic studies and data are “FOIA-exempt,” meaning the public is not given access to them.

• There are those in the UFO community who are skeptical of DeLonge’s motives. They believe he simply wants to profit off his UFO-related books, websites and merchandise, and that his antics are part of the business plan.

• As the Academy’s head of Global Security and Special Programs, Elizondo serves as a liaison to the government, including Congress, the Pentagon and the intelligence services. Elizondo thinks that the next six months or so will be pivotal to the success of ‘To the Stars’ when he expects to be able to present more data on UFO sightings. “I’m not worried about credibility,” Elizondo says. “I’m worried about facts.” Reminded that the only facts the public has now are grainy videos, he insists, “There is data. It’s not out yet.”

• Elizondo understands why many remain dubious. “I get it. I’m a career spy,” he says.” “No, I am not running a government disinformation campaign.” “I took a huge risk in leaving a safe job to do this. If this doesn’t pan out, I’ll be working at Walmart.” “But…as crazy as it sounds, this is real.”

 

“I know what I saw.”

It was late July, and Teresa Tindal, a 39-year-old administrator for a consulting firm, was describing the incident that made her a believer: a round, golden object hovering in the evening sky over Tucson, Arizona. Weather balloon? No way. It could only be one thing: a UFO.

This kind of certainty had brought her—and 400 other people—to the Crowne Plaza hotel in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, for the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) Symposium, the “premiere UFO event of the year,” according to its literature. They had gathered to talk about extraterrestrials, UFOs and how to avoid being abducted by an alien mothership (hint: yelling at it doesn’t work). “There are too many people that have seen things,” Christine Thisse, 44, a soft-spoken mother from Michigan, told Newsweek.

There were the typical guest speakers giving talks with titles like “Unexplained Disappearances in Rural Areas” and “Report From Mars,” in which a physicist lays out his theory that 75,000 years ago an intergalactic nuclear war wiped out a Martian civilization. And there were famous abductees, like Travis Walton, a former logger whose story of alien captivity became the 1993 movie Fire in the Sky.

But this year offered another attraction—a new, and extremely unlikely, superstar: Luis Elizondo. Seven months earlier, The New York Times had published a front-page story on the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program, a “shadowy” initiative at the Pentagon that “investigated reports of unidentified flying objects.” Elizondo, a burly Miami native with a billy-goat beard and colorful tattoos, was the career military intelligence official put in charge of the program a few years after it formed in 2007, until, according to the Pentagon’s press office, it was discontinued in 2012. (Elizondo insists the work is ongoing.) Last year, he resigned from the Pentagon, protesting what he considered lackluster support and unnecessary secrecy—red meat for the X-Files crowd. “Why aren’t we spending more time and effort on this issue?” he wrote to Defense Secretary James Mattis in his resignation letter.

In the private sector, Elizondo soon found an unlikely ally in his quest for the truth: Tom DeLonge, the former frontman for the pop/punk band Blink-182, the group behind a song called “Aliens Exist.” Turns out DeLonge actually believed it. In 2017, he launched To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science, and Elizondo quickly became its public face. The mission: to advance UFO research, produce science-fiction-themed entertainment about UFOs and, with luck, glean some insight into the super-advanced technology displayed by UFOs (such as spaceships that can seemingly defy gravity) that the Pentagon keeps ignoring.

The academy claims to have attracted more than 2,000 investors and raised roughly $2.5 million, and Elizondo found a mostly enthusiastic crowd in Cherry Hill. “Sometimes people may have associated you with being fringe—being out there,” he told the MUFON audience over a buffet dinner. “All along, you were right.” Not everyone was convinced: Some cited a lack of evidence in his presentation. Tindal was suspicious of the Pentagon connection. “It could be a cover for something else,” she said.

But if Elizondo is trying to lend credibility to research on unexplained sightings, why would he partner with a guy whose band had a hit album titled Enema of the State? And why would he choose as a venue a UFO conference teeming with conspiracy theorists?

“We have to start somewhere,” he told Newsweek that day. “I don’t get invited to Stanford or MIT.”

Super Hornets and Tic Tacs

Each year, thousands of people report UFO sightings to various authorities—the police, the Pentagon, radio talk show hosts. By one count, more than 100,000 sightings have been reported since 1905. Nearly all can be explained away as clouds, meteors, birds, weather balloons or some other quotidian phenomenon. Efforts at rational debunking serve only to harden the conviction of the true believers, who are convinced that abundant evidence of alien visitations is hidden in secret military documents—literal X-files—locked away in the bowels of the so-called deep state.

The X-files conspiracy theory is the beating heart of the UFO community—an article of faith among enthusiasts and the basis of almost every call to action on social media (#Disclosure). It is also encouraged by some prominent people, including John ¬Podesta, who lamented on Twitter a few years ago that he’d failed to secure the #disclosure of the UFO files, “despite being President Bill Clinton’s chief of staff.

When Elizondo went public, it gave a sheen of credibility to the conspiracy crowd. His background is typical of a straight-arrow military officer with a distinguished career. He is the son of a Cuban exile who participated in the Bay of Pigs—the failed CIA-¬sponsored plot to overthrow Fidel Castro in 1961. Elizondo worked as a bouncer while attending the University of Miami. After graduating in 1995, he joined the Army and trained to be a military spy. Later, at the Pentagon, Elizondo showed no sign of being a disgruntled employee or a loon, spending much of his career in the shadows, chasing militants in South America and the Middle East.

In 2010, he started to run a small group charged with investigating reports of “unexplained aerial phenomena”—a less controversial term for UFOs. It was an ¬obscure, low-budget initiative created three years before at the behest of then-Senator Harry Reid of Nevada. Details are murky, but the $22 million program seems to have been operated jointly by Elizondo and Bigelow Aerospace, a Nevada-based defense contractor whose billionaire owner, Robert Bigelow, is an avid believer in UFOs.

Two months before the Times published its front-page story, Elizondo retired from the Pentagon. He shows Newsweek what he says is a copy of his resignation letter, dated October 4, 2017, and addressed to Mattis. The letter expresses some frustration about the lack of attention his program was getting. And it suggests that something he learned at the Pentagon turned him into a true believer. “Despite overwhelming evidence at both the classified and unclassified levels,” he wrote, “certain individuals in the Department remain staunchly opposed to further research on what could be a tactical threat to our pilots, sailors, and soldiers, and perhaps even an existential threat to our national security.”

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

The Pentagon Secretly Studied ‘Exotic and Sophisticated’ UFO Technologies, Bombshell Letter Reveals

by Jasper Hamill                          August 13, 2018                           (metro.co.uk)

• Last December, the world first learned of a Pentagon UFO research program called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) dedicated to exploring ‘unexplained aerial phenomena’ and a range of futuristic technologies. Former program manager, Luis Elizondo, said he believed there is ‘very compelling evidence we may not be alone’, and has alluded to mysterious ‘metamaterials’ from crashed alien spacecraft being stored in specially modified warehouses in Las Vegas.

• Now, a letter obtained by George Knapp’s KLAS ‘Las Vegas Now’ I-Team written June 24, 2009 by then Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to William Lynn III, Deputy Secretary of Defense has revealed the US government’s exploration of ‘disruptive aerospace technologies’. Without mentioning aliens or UFOs, the letter confirms that the US Senate ordered an assessment of ‘far term foreign aerospace threats’. These include ‘extremely sophisticated concepts within the world of quantum mechanics, nuclear science, electromagnetic theory, gravitics [anti-gravity], and thermodynamics’.

• Senator Reid warns in his letter that these technologies ‘have the potential to be used with catastrophic effects by adversaries’, but that ‘much progress has been made with the identification of several highly sensitive, unconventional aerospace-related findings’.

• ‘Ultimately, the results of AATIP will not only benefit the US Government but I believe will directly benefit the Department of Defense in ways not imagined,’ Senator Reid wrote. ‘The technological insight and capability gained will provide the US with a distinct advantage over any foreign threats and allow the US to maintain its preeminence as a world leader.’

• Former UFO investigator for the British Ministry of Defence, Nick Pope, said the document reveals just how seriously the US government takes the issue of ‘futurist technology’ and the associated threats and opportunities. Pope had previously said that the AATIP looked at UFO sightings as part of a wider intelligence assessment of the threat from next-generation aircraft, missiles and drones, and the ‘novel military applications’ that we felt might be derived from a fuller understanding of the phenomenon.’

• Britain and the US share concerns that Russia and China might beat us to the punch in the weaponization of futuristic technologies, says Pope. “[I]t’s time to drop our prejudices about the subject and to stop referring to ‘flying saucers’ and ‘little green men’. “It’s time to realize that… there are serious defense and national security issues involved and that the US, the UK, Russia, China – and maybe others – are engaged in potentially game-changing work on this subject.”

[Editor’s Note]  Futuristic weapons technologies. Trump’s declaration that ‘space is a war-fighting domain’. The creation of a US Space Force. Who or what are we gearing up to fight, or to defend ourselves from or free ourselves from? Perhaps the Draco Reptilian and Nazi Dark Fleet alliance?

 

Documents relating to a highly sensitive investigation government project called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) confirm that the US has studied a range of futuristic technologies which would allow it to exercise global military dominance for decades to come. This programme is dedicated to exploring ‘ unexplained aerial phenomena’ and is believed to have written a 490-page report which collects together UFO sightings from around the world. The world first heard about AATIP last year, when footage of an encounter between an F/A-18 Super Hornet fighter jet and an oval-shaped UFO travelling at astonishing speed was released.

Now a letter sent from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to William Lynn III, Deputy Secretary of Defense, has revealed tantalising new details of the US government’s exploration of ‘disruptive aerospace technologies’. Although the correspondence does not mention aliens or UFOs, it appears to confirm the US Senate ordered an assessment of ‘far term foreign aerospace threats’. It is not known whether these threats were alien in origin – or came from some rival military power. It said these include ‘extremely sophisticated concepts within the world of quantum mechanics, nuclear science, electromagnetic theory, gravitics [anti-gravity], and thermodynamics’. These technologies ‘have the potential to be used with catastrophic effects by adversaries’ Senator Reid warned in his letter, which was obtained by Las Vegas Now. The letter also said ‘much progress has been made with the identification of several highly sensitive, unconventional aerospace-related findings’.

‘Ultimately, the results of AATIP will not only benefit the US Government but I believe will directly benefit the Department of Defense in ways not imagined,’ he wrote. ‘The technological insight and capability gained will provide the US with a distinct advantage over any foreign threats and allow the US to maintain its preeminence as a world leader.’ Nick Pope, a former UFO investigator for the British Ministry of Defence, said the ‘bombshell’ document ‘reveals much more about the AATIP project than was previously known’. ‘These staggering revelations show just how seriously the US government took the issue. Irrespective of what they believed about the true nature of the UFO phenomenon, this letter gives a telling insight into the reasons why the Pentagon was interested, and what they thought the threats and opportunities might be,’ he told The Metro.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

I-Team Obtains Some Key Documents Related to Pentagon UFO Study

by George Knapp and Matt Adams              July 25, 2018               (lasvegasnow.com)

• Since the December 2017 NY Times article releasing U.S. military video of the “Tic-Tac UFO”, and subsequent UFO videos, thousands of Freedom of Information Act requests have been filed by UFO researchers. So far, the Pentagon hasn’t complied with any of the requests for more information. According to Luis Elizondo, the man who ran the military’s secret UFO study for years, says that there are as many as two dozen more unreleased videos still in the Pentagon vaults. The Las Vegas KLAS-TV “I-Team” has managed to obtain key documents related to the UFO inquiry.

• Former Senate Majority Leader, Nevada Senator Harry Reid instigated the Pentagon study back in 2007. Since his role was revealed last year, he’s had calls from many other lawmakers in Congress. Reid believes there have likely been classified Congressional briefings involving military eyewitnesses to similar UFOs. Reid wants the military UFO program to continue and its findings made public.  (See 2009 letter from Reid to the Deputy Secretary of Defense asking for more personnel to increase productivity in the Advanced Aerospace Threat and Identification Program.)

• As the chief scientist for Bigelow Aerospace Advanced Space Studies, a government-sponsored research project, physicist Hal Puthoff made the first public presentation about the UFO study. In a newly released document, research subjects are listed including warp drive, invisibility, metamaterials from crash sites, worm holes, antigravity, and how to track hypersonic vehicles.

• “You’ve got these advanced aerospace vehicles flying around, that we don’t know where they come from, what the intent is, possibly off-world even,” said Dr. Puthoff. Puthoff says he doesn’t know if more UFO videos will be released, but says there is big news coming about the ones already made public.

 

LAS VEGAS – Those secret UFO files at the Pentagon are still secret, but not for a lack of trying.
Thousands of researchers have filed requests via the Freedom of Information Act, hoping to force the military to unleash documents or videos generated during the secret study. The main contractor for the Pentagon was a Las Vegas company.

So far, the Pentagon hasn’t complied with any of the requests for more information. But now, the I-Team has obtained key documents related to the UFO inquiry.

The Pentagon’s release last December of a 2004 encounter between pilots from the USS Nimitz and a mystery machine dubbed the Tic Tac UFO generated huge headlines and demands for more releases.

Two more followed. The Gimbal video from 2015 and another nicknamed Go Fast. As many as two dozen more videos are still in the Pentagon vaults, according to the man who ran the military’s secret UFO study for years.

During his time running the AATIP program, Elizondo set into motion the release of these and other videos. He doesn’t know if the spigot has been turned off now that he is longer there. Since October, he’s been working with To the Stars Academy to help change the perception of the UFO issue, particularly in Washington. And without revealing too much, Elizondo hints that progress is being made.

“It’s about changing the paradigm in which our government can finally take this issue seriously without worrying about their political survival, right, allowing Congress to have a conversation in open or closed session saying, all right guys, gals, what do we do about this?”

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

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