• Home
  • Ministry of Defence

Tag: Ministry of Defence

No Time for Aliens: How the MoD Tried to Prove No One’s Out There

by Damien Gayle            May 6, 2018            (theguardian.com)

• In 1997, Britain’s DI55 “Defence Intelligence” embarked on a campaign to absolve the Ministry of Defence of responsibility for investigating UFO sightings. A report obtained through a Freedom of Information request by David Clarke, a research fellow and lecturer in journalism at Sheffield Hallam University, shows that the MoD was motivated by “The increasing media attention given to this subject in recent months [which] has almost doubled the work of the desk officers involved to the detriment of other tasks more directly relevant to the work of the branch.” It was now time to “reappraise the situation” and clarify DIS’s role in the issue.

• What becomes clear from the FOIA files is a fear among officials of further inciting UFO-mania. “We need to be very careful about expanding ‘UFO’ business and thereby sending the public a misleading message about the extent of the MoD’s interest,” says one memo.

• The report was completed in 2000 and duly discounted alien spaceships over the UK, giving DI55 the grounds it needed to no longer accept reports of UFO sightings. Then Defence Intelligence destroyed the files on which the report was based, including the analysis database. The MoD closed its UFO desk in 2009 after it was decided it served no defense purpose and that it took staff away from more valuable defense-related activities.

• The study replaced one mystery with another after its author determined that the UFO sightings were a result of unexplained plasma formations in the atmosphere.

 

It was 1997, the 50th anniversary of the suspected flying saucer crash at Roswell in New Mexico, and the heyday of the paranormal mystery series The X-Files. The English-speaking world was gripped by UFO-mania. But what seemed a delightful mystery to some was becoming a headache for the spooks at Britain’s Defence Intelligence Staff.

Analysts at the DI55 office, the department lumbered with the UFO brief, were being peppered with requests from ufologists – and even parliamentary questions – for information on flying saucers, taking up time they felt would be better spent on terrestrial defence matters. So top brass decided to undertake a definitive study of the unit’s collection of reported UFO sightings to establish, once and for all, whether there was anything in them.

Previously unseen documents reveal that, far from being an objective study into the possibility of extraterrestrial visitors, the report was intended from the start to absolve the Ministry of Defence of responsibility for investigating sightings. Messages between officials at DIS and the contractor carrying out the research show that it focused from the outset only “on the possible threat to the UK [from hostile foreign powers] and technology acquisition” and not “X-Files activities such as alien abductions”. A separate memo says: “It shouldn’t be driven by a UFO thesis.”

The study replaced one mystery with another after its author determined that the UFO sightings were a result of unexplained plasma formations in the atmosphere. Nevertheless, DI55 announced afterwards that it would no longer accept UFO reports.

The documents show the deliberations behind the research, which began in 1997 and collated the previous decade’s worth of UFO sightings – known in the technical jargon of DIS as unidentified aerial phenomena (UAPs) – in a database. The identities of all the officers involved in the conversation, which lasted several years, are redacted. Many other excerpts are blacked out, with exemptions cited including risks to national security and international relations.

“The increasing media attention given to this subject in recent months has almost doubled the work of the desk officers involved to the detriment of other tasks more directly relevant to the work of the branch,” one memo says, adding that it was now time to “reappraise the situation” and clarify DIS’s role in the issue.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

The Final Part of Britain’s Real-Life X-Files Has Been Released – But Does the Government Have Something to Hide?

by George Harrison             January 5, 2018              (thesun.co.uk)

• Britain’s Ministry of Defence has spent ten years releasing a trickle of declassified files relating to UFO sightings. The final three documents were made public on January 1, 2018. These MoD “X-Files” are formerly top-secret papers containing eyewitness accounts, sketches and police reports of UFO sightings from the 1970’s to the early 2000’s. But the final three documents just released are all dated from 1986.

• Defence officials decided to release the documents to save the hassle of responding to thousands of freedom of information requests about the government’s knowledge of UFOs. But these last three won’t be available online (as are all of the previous documents). Anyone who wants to read them will have to either visit the National Archives or order a copy of the documents for a copying fee.

• UFO enthusiasts are glad that the British military has released their UFO files, but why did it take ten years to do so?

• Former MoD official Nick Pope says, “There’s no smoking gun in these files that says UFOs are extraterrestrial.”

 

The MoD (Britain’s Ministry of Defence) has spent ten years releasing a trickle of declassified files relating to UFO sightings… and now the final three documents have been made public.

This final release completes the Government’s long process of publishing Britain’s real-life X Files, formerly top-secret papers containing eyewitness accounts, sketches and police reports of UFO sightings from the 1970s to the early noughties (ie: the early 2000’s for Americans).

Over the past decade, the files, which have been drip-fed into the public domain to hush any claims of a conspiracy, were ushered out without any fanfare from the Government, with batches steadily and unceremoniously cropping up online.

The final three documents appeared on the National Archives website on January 1, and are all dated from 1986.

One is described as UFO incidents, while the others are filed under UFO reports and UFO correspondence.
But, even after spending the past three decades behind the closed doors of the MoD, they’re unlikely to satisfy conspiracy theorists.

Unlike many of the releases before it, this final wave of files won’t be available online, and the timing of their publication is sure to cause more a stir among the UFO community.

Officials originally decided to circulate the documents to save the hassle of responding to thousands of freedom of information requests about the Government’s knowledge of UFOs.

But Nick Pope, who used to run the Ministry of Defence’s UFO project, says conspiracy theorists are likely to be “incensed” by the questions thrown up by the final file dump.

Now, believers will want to know why the Government waited ten years to release these files, and why they’ve been made so hard to get hold of.

Why January 1?

One reason why UFO hunters are unlikely to be happy is the precise timing of the release, on New Years Day.

Nick says: “This looks suspiciously as if The National Archives tried to sneak out this release when nobody was looking.”

Some will be asking whether this was an attempt to bury the release by shuffling it out on a bank holiday when everyone was in bed.

It’s true that January 1 is a common release date for public files, but hardcore UFO hunters will want to know why the MoD has held on to these for so long in the first place.

Is there a link to the Pentagon’s UFO research?

This final wave of files, which caps off a ten-year release programme, was published after the big news broke that the American government was hiding its own X Files.

Nick said: “Coming so soon after the revelations about the Pentagon’s UFO program, this will raise suspicion in the UFO community that there’s been co-ordination between the US and UK government on this.”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Copyright © 2018 Exopolitics Institute News Service. All Rights Reserved.