• Home
  • Luis Elizondo

Tag: Luis Elizondo

From the X-Files – Is the Pentagon Hiding UFOs in a Las Vegas Hangar?

September 9, 2018                       (dailygalaxy.com)

• “Disclosure is not an event, it’s a process,” said Luis Elizondo, former head of the Pentagon’s Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program (AATIP). “My personal belief is that there is very compelling evidence that we may not be alone.”

• Elizondo left the Pentagon program in October of last year, saying that the government was not taking UFO sightings by the military seriously enough. The Pentagon admitted the existence of AATIP, but claimed it was discontinued in 2012. But in an interview with The (UK’s) Sunday Times, Elizondo reports that the program was never wound up and continued to monitor UFO sightings until as recently as last October when he quit.

• On the northern edge of the Las Vegas sprawl where city meets desert is the headquarters of Bigelow Aerospace, a company that plans to launch and sell its own space stations and build a space hotel and a lunar base. Armed sentries guard the building which may hold exotic “metamaterials” – synthetic materials with composite structures that exhibit properties not found naturally materials – of a crashed UFO spacecraft, according to Elizondo. (see image below) From 2007 to 2011, Bigelow Aerospace, a company founded by Robert Bigelow, 73, an entrepreneur and self-avowed ufologist, was paid $22 million by the Department of Defense.

• Former Nevada Senator, Harry Reid, was the point man in funding the Pentagon program and Bigelow Aerospace. Reid said, “I had talked to (astronaut) John Glenn a number of years before. [Glenn] thought that the federal government should be looking seriously into UFOs, and should be talking to military service members, particularly pilots, who had reported seeing aircraft they could not identify or explain.”

• When the existence of the Pentagon UFO program was released late last year, the secret was out. Most questions, such as where the money went, and what Bigelow is closely guarding in Las Vegas, have remained unanswered. The conspiracy website, Abovetopsecret.com, reported that Bigelow approached Mufon in 2008 with a business proposal to buy its database of UFO sightings and archive of evidence, including quite possibly alien artifacts, for $672,000. By November 2009, $334,000 of it had been paid.

• “Captured alloys and material from UFOs — that has to be alien, right?” says John Greenewald of the Black Vault website. “This rivals the Roswell debris going to Hangar 18.”

• “Internationally, we are the most backward country in the world on this issue,” says Bigelow. “Our scientists are scared of being ostracized, and our media is scared of the stigma. China and Russia are much more open and work on this with huge organizations within their countries. Smaller countries like Belgium, France, England and South American countries like Chile are more open, too. They are proactive and willing to discuss this topic, rather than being held back by a juvenile taboo.”

 

“Disclosure has already occurred. Disclosure is not an event, it’s a process,” said Luis Elizondo, former head of a hitherto unknown government operation called the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program (AATIP). “My personal belief is that there is very compelling evidence that we may not be alone.”

On the northern edge of the Las Vegas sprawl where city meets desert, a vast building resembling a giant hangar, the headquarters of Bigelow Aerospace, a company that plans to launch and sell its own space stations and, more ambitiously, build a space hotel and a lunar base, occupies a 50-acre city block . This is the headquarters of Bigelow Aerospace, a company that plans to launch and sell its own space stations and, more ambitiously, build a space hotel and a lunar base. Today, the hangar doors are closed and tumbleweed now blows across the car parks.

 addition made to Bigelow Aerospace       corporate compound

The perimeter is secured with razor wire and concrete barriers, and the only staff visible from outside are armed guards, hiding inside what’s speculated to be salvage of a crashed extraterrestrial object –commonly known as a UFO.

Residents of the neat residential streets say security was tightened at Bigelow Aerospace late last year when it was revealed by the New York Times and Washington post that the company was paid by the Pentagon to store parts recovered from crashed “unidentified aerial phenomena” — military-speak for UFOs — exotic materials believed to be alloys that defied scientific analysis and physically affected those who came into contact with them.

                              Robert Bigelow

Not since 1947, when the US army said it had found a crashed UFO near Roswell, New Mexico, but in fact proved to be a weather balloon had the government come so close to admitting we are not alone in the vast reaches of the Milky Way.

But to date, there has been no retraction of the latest story of Pentagon UFO intrigue. Questioned about the events, the Pentagon has maintained an information blackout, as has Bigelow Aerospace. With no new leads, websites normally regarded as outlets for conspiracy theorists have turned up intriguing new evidence and stolen a march on America’s mainstream media.

The strange story of the salvaged UFOs began with the abrupt resignation last autumn of a senior Pentagon official, reports Nick Rufford for The Times of London. Luis Elizondo was the head of a hitherto unknown government operation called the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program (AATIP), run by a team of 12, based on the fifth floor of the Pentagon called C-ring.

In a parting letter to Jim Mattis, the US defence secretary, Elizondo said the government was not taking sightings of unidentified craft by American warplanes seriously enough.

“Why aren’t we spending more time and effort on this issue? There remains a vital need to ascertain capability and intent of these phenomena for the benefit of the armed forces and the nation.” Elizondo’s leaked letter blew the lid off what was, in effect, a clandestine government UFO-watching unit, infuriating the Pentagon’s top brass. In a terse statement, the Pentagon admitted the existence of AATIP without mentioning the UFO connection: the program, it said, was set up “to assess far-term, foreign advanced aerospace threats to the United States”, it said, and was discontinued in 2012 to make way for “other higher priority issues”.

Since then, Elizondo, whose impeccable credentials were confirmed by The Washington Post, has remained largely silent on the subject. But in an interview with The Sunday Times, he reports that the program was never wound up and continued to monitor UFO sightings until as recently as last October, when he quit. In the fascinating video below emphatically states that “disclosure has already occurred. Disclosure is not an event, it’s a process.

5:18 minute video excerpt of Robert Bigelow interview on “60 Minutes”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

They’ve ‘Seen Things’

by Rozette Rago                 August 14, 2018                        (nytimes.com)


• UFO social groups are becoming popular. One such group was begun in Los Angeles by Robert Bingham, 62, who has held his annual UFO “Summon Events” in an LA park since 2010.  (seen above)  It began when Bingham was 39 and saw a 20-foot tall worm-shaped ship zipping through the clouds. He’s seen and taken photos of a ‘saucer’ and some flying objects shaped like beans. His photos began to attract dozens of believers from all over the world who come to share their own stories of UFOs and extraterrestrial communications. Bingham attempts to summon UFOs at these gatherings.

• “It’s a great community because you can talk about anything and you’re not worried about being called crazy,” said Hans Boysen, 53, who has participated in the last seven summoning sessions with Bingham since 2011. Boysen has gone on to co-found another group called the L.A. U.F.O. Channel who meet monthly.

• Rafael Cebrian, 29, a two-time attendee, brought a curious friend who was visiting from Spain. He said it was about being open and being in the right state of mind.

• Angel Llewellyn, 49, drove to Bingham’s event from San Jose, California, for a second year as a form of pilgrimage. “It’s like he charges you,” she said (as in ‘inspires’ you, not as in charging you admission). “He teaches you how to call [UFOs] and what to think and they just, boom, boom, boom. It’s like fishing. You never know what you’re going to get.”

• Other groups like the U.F.O. and Paranormal Research Society focus on discussions, often with speakers who talk about their research and experiences. A nonprofit group called the Mutual U.F.O. Network, or Mufon, founded in 1969, has over 4,000 members worldwide and convenes a yearly symposium. This year, a former Pentagon intelligence officer, Luis Elizondo, will give the Mufon keynote address. Many in the community believe that organizations such as the ‘To The Stars Academy for Arts and Science’, headed by Elizondo and former Blink-182 guitarist Tom DeLonge, are just the beginning to discovering the truth about ETs and UFOs.

• Yasmin Joyner, 35, an artist, recently formed another UFO discussion group, Indigo Army, that she hopes will attract a younger and more diverse crowd. Its members organize sightings at one another’s houses and nearby parks. Joyner says she understands that there are consequences to being outspoken about beliefs that many people may deem weird or crazy. “I think my family was a bit worried that I had snapped or something, but once they saw my footage and what I was seeing, they understood,” she said.

• Mallory Jackson, 26, who attends ‘hangouts’ led by Mr. Bingham and the Indigo Army, says she finds it difficult to maintain relationships outside the U.F.O. community with people who might not be as understanding of her interests. “[Y]ou’ll see all ages, all ethnicities, all genders,” says Ms. Jackson. “It’s beautiful, and we’re all just trying to figure it out as we go.” She became friends with several members “right away” before meeting another longtime attendee of Mr. Bingham’s events, Jim Martin, 38, who is now her boyfriend.

• How exactly does the group try to summon UFOs? Most agree that it’s similar to meditating, accompanied by a physical sensation. Joyner says the important thing is to focus. At the event in April, some participants closed their eyes and stood silently. Some stared intently into the sky. When someone spots something, they train a telescope on the object which is connected to a camera and a screen that shows and records what is being seen. They post the best videos on their YouTube channel.

 

Robert Bingham has “seen things.” When he was 39, he looked skyward and noticed a worm-shaped ship about 20 feet tall zipping through the clouds.

Unusual things kept popping up around him — or above him, rather. He saw a saucer and some flying objects shaped like beans next. He snapped a picture.

For over ten years, he kept his sightings to himself. That changed in 2010, when his neighbor came over to do some plumbing work. Mr. Bingham showed him his photos. The neighbor asked if he could invite his brother, who was very interested in unidentified flying objects, or U.F.O.s.

In awe of what they saw, they asked if they could invite more people to speak with Mr. Bingham — 40 more, actually. More than eight years ago, that was the first meeting of what is now known as “Summon Events with Robert Bingham,” at a park in Los Angeles across the street from where Mr. Bingham worked as a security guard.

Mr. Bingham, 62, an unassuming man who describes himself as shy, has become the nexus of a community of U.F.O. hunters in Los Angeles, fervent believers who come together to share their stories and persuade skeptics that extraterrestrial communications aren’t just a conceit for television shows.

Since then, he has attracted U.F.O. enthusiasts from all over the world, drawn together by the same questions: What are these things in the sky, exactly, and how can we learn more about them?

While there is just not enough documentation or scientific evidence to begin to explain or even confirm these sightings, that doesn’t stop the dozens of people that once a year descend on the same park to watch and assist Mr. Bingham as he tries to summon the “objects,” as they call them, and also to hang out with other enthusiasts who have turned into friends.

“It’s a great community because you can talk about anything and you’re not worried about being called crazy,” said Hans Boysen, 53, who has participated in the last seven summoning sessions with Bingham since 2011.

Other groups, like the U.F.O. and Paranormal Research Society, don’t organize sighting sessions, but rather focus on discussions, often with speakers who talk about their research and experiences. A nonprofit group called the Mutual U.F.O. Network, or Mufon, founded in 1969, has over 4,000 members worldwide and convenes a yearly symposium. This year, a former Pentagon intelligence officer, Luis Elizondo, will give the keynote address.

Last year, The New York Times conducted interviews and obtained records pertaining to the $22 million spent on the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program. The program — parts of which remain classified — investigated reports of unidentified flying objects, according to Defense Department officials. According to the article, officials insisted that the effort had ended after five years, in 2012. The article also stated that Sara Seager, an astrophysicist at M.I.T., cautioned that not knowing the origin of an object does not mean that it is from another planet or galaxy. “When people claim to observe truly unusual phenomena, sometimes it’s worth investigating seriously,” she said. But, she added, “what people sometimes don’t get about science is that we often have phenomena that remain unexplained.”

As much as scientists deal with probabilities, they rely on data and the reality is, no matter how many videos people upload on YouTube, they’re simply not enough to draw any definitive conclusions from.

But that doesn’t stop this community from searching. Many in the community that forms around Mr. Bingham believe that the multimillion-dollar alien research efforts of the former Blink-182 guitarist and singer Tom DeLonge are just the beginning to finding out some answers. Mr. DeLonge made headlines after To the Stars Academy of Arts & Science, a research group he founded — Mr. Elizondo is its director of global security and special programs — released declassified footage from the Department of Defense and continues his efforts.

Angel Llewellyn, 49, drove to the event from San Jose, Calif., for a second year as a form of pilgrimage. She said she started seeing things right after attending to Mr. Bingham’s event for the first time.

“It’s like he charges you,” she said. “He teaches you how to call them and what to think and they just, boom, boom, boom. It’s like fishing. You never know what you’re going to get.”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

The Pentagon Secretly Studied ‘Exotic and Sophisticated’ UFO Technologies, Bombshell Letter Reveals

by Jasper Hamill                          August 13, 2018                           (metro.co.uk)

• Last December, the world first learned of a Pentagon UFO research program called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) dedicated to exploring ‘unexplained aerial phenomena’ and a range of futuristic technologies. Former program manager, Luis Elizondo, said he believed there is ‘very compelling evidence we may not be alone’, and has alluded to mysterious ‘metamaterials’ from crashed alien spacecraft being stored in specially modified warehouses in Las Vegas.

• Now, a letter obtained by George Knapp’s KLAS ‘Las Vegas Now’ I-Team written June 24, 2009 by then Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to William Lynn III, Deputy Secretary of Defense has revealed the US government’s exploration of ‘disruptive aerospace technologies’. Without mentioning aliens or UFOs, the letter confirms that the US Senate ordered an assessment of ‘far term foreign aerospace threats’. These include ‘extremely sophisticated concepts within the world of quantum mechanics, nuclear science, electromagnetic theory, gravitics [anti-gravity], and thermodynamics’.

• Senator Reid warns in his letter that these technologies ‘have the potential to be used with catastrophic effects by adversaries’, but that ‘much progress has been made with the identification of several highly sensitive, unconventional aerospace-related findings’.

• ‘Ultimately, the results of AATIP will not only benefit the US Government but I believe will directly benefit the Department of Defense in ways not imagined,’ Senator Reid wrote. ‘The technological insight and capability gained will provide the US with a distinct advantage over any foreign threats and allow the US to maintain its preeminence as a world leader.’

• Former UFO investigator for the British Ministry of Defence, Nick Pope, said the document reveals just how seriously the US government takes the issue of ‘futurist technology’ and the associated threats and opportunities. Pope had previously said that the AATIP looked at UFO sightings as part of a wider intelligence assessment of the threat from next-generation aircraft, missiles and drones, and the ‘novel military applications’ that we felt might be derived from a fuller understanding of the phenomenon.’

• Britain and the US share concerns that Russia and China might beat us to the punch in the weaponization of futuristic technologies, says Pope. “[I]t’s time to drop our prejudices about the subject and to stop referring to ‘flying saucers’ and ‘little green men’. “It’s time to realize that… there are serious defense and national security issues involved and that the US, the UK, Russia, China – and maybe others – are engaged in potentially game-changing work on this subject.”

[Editor’s Note]  Futuristic weapons technologies. Trump’s declaration that ‘space is a war-fighting domain’. The creation of a US Space Force. Who or what are we gearing up to fight, or to defend ourselves from or free ourselves from? Perhaps the Draco Reptilian and Nazi Dark Fleet alliance?

 

Documents relating to a highly sensitive investigation government project called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) confirm that the US has studied a range of futuristic technologies which would allow it to exercise global military dominance for decades to come. This programme is dedicated to exploring ‘ unexplained aerial phenomena’ and is believed to have written a 490-page report which collects together UFO sightings from around the world. The world first heard about AATIP last year, when footage of an encounter between an F/A-18 Super Hornet fighter jet and an oval-shaped UFO travelling at astonishing speed was released.

Now a letter sent from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to William Lynn III, Deputy Secretary of Defense, has revealed tantalising new details of the US government’s exploration of ‘disruptive aerospace technologies’. Although the correspondence does not mention aliens or UFOs, it appears to confirm the US Senate ordered an assessment of ‘far term foreign aerospace threats’. It is not known whether these threats were alien in origin – or came from some rival military power. It said these include ‘extremely sophisticated concepts within the world of quantum mechanics, nuclear science, electromagnetic theory, gravitics [anti-gravity], and thermodynamics’. These technologies ‘have the potential to be used with catastrophic effects by adversaries’ Senator Reid warned in his letter, which was obtained by Las Vegas Now. The letter also said ‘much progress has been made with the identification of several highly sensitive, unconventional aerospace-related findings’.

‘Ultimately, the results of AATIP will not only benefit the US Government but I believe will directly benefit the Department of Defense in ways not imagined,’ he wrote. ‘The technological insight and capability gained will provide the US with a distinct advantage over any foreign threats and allow the US to maintain its preeminence as a world leader.’ Nick Pope, a former UFO investigator for the British Ministry of Defence, said the ‘bombshell’ document ‘reveals much more about the AATIP project than was previously known’. ‘These staggering revelations show just how seriously the US government took the issue. Irrespective of what they believed about the true nature of the UFO phenomenon, this letter gives a telling insight into the reasons why the Pentagon was interested, and what they thought the threats and opportunities might be,’ he told The Metro.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 8

Copyright © 2018 Exopolitics Institute News Service. All Rights Reserved.