• Home
  • Jacques Vallee

Tag: Jacques Vallee

UNCW Professor Explores UFOs

by Ben Steelman                 March 8, 2019                   (newbernsj.com)

• In her book, “American Cosmic”, professor Diana Pasulka, chair of the department of philosophy and religion at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, notes the similarities between people’s belief in extraterrestrial beings and starships, and people who believe in organized religion.

• For six years, Pasulka has focused on a small group of respectable academic scientists and researchers who believe that UFOs are real, ET beings have been in contact with us, and that the government knows much more than it’s telling. While many of these scientists remain anonymous, Pasulka was able to interview some including Jacques Vallee, the former NASA scientist and co-founder of ARPANET, an ancestor of the modern Internet.

• Several of the scientists Pasulka interviewed claim to have had non-verbal communication with alien beings. In some cases, the scientists believe the beings fed them inspirations or ideas for new innovations. For Pasulka, these descriptions sound a lot like traditional descriptions of divine inspiration or the Voice of God. She specifically notes the calling of Samuel in the Old Testament.

• ET believers’ often traffic in “artifacts” from UFO crashes which seem to possess uncanny powers. This reminds Pasulka of the medieval obsession with saints’ relics or with splinters from the True Cross.

• Descriptions of modern UFO encounters often involving loud humming, thunder, dancing lights and appearances of luminous beings — eerily similar to accounts of the miracles in Fatima, Portugal, in 1917.

• Pasulka notes a sharp disconnect between the believers who see the alien intelligences as mostly benign, and modern media which prefers scary stories like “Independence Day” or “Signs.”

• Again and again, she finds parallels between Catholic miracles and UFO beliefs. Ultimately, Pasulka sees both quests as a search for answers to unknowable mysteries and for guidance to who we are and where we are going.

[Editor’s Note]   Upon noting the similarities between ancient religions and modern UFO experiences, it isn’t such a great leap to speculate that these ancient religious accounts are actually descriptions of early human civilizations’ encounters with UFOs and extraterrestrial beings thousands of years ago, and they simply formed a religion around the experiences.

 

Depending on which poll you choose, between one-third and nearly half of Americans believe in unidentified flying objects, intelligent beings from other planets and those beings coming to visit (and, occasionally, probe) us.
The famed psychologist Carl Jung referred to UFOs as “a modern myth of things unseen.” For Jung, the question wasn’t so much whether UFOs exist or what they are as why we believe in them.

Diana Pasulka, a professor who chairs the department of philosophy and religion at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, takes much the same view in “American Cosmic.” For her, belief in starships and little green men proves remarkably similar to belief in organized (or disorganized) religion. At times, the two might be almost interchangeable.

            Diana Pasulka

Lots of “new” religions and cults place faith in UFOs, from Heaven’s Gate and Unarians to the Church of Scientologyand the Nation of Islam. A study of one such cult in the 1950s led psychologist Leon Festinger and colleagues to the theory of cognitive dissonance, how true believers adjust their worldviews when prophecy fails.

These, however, aren’t Pasulka’s real concern. For six years, she focused on a small tribe of academic scientists, published researchers with respectable records, who nevertheless believe UFOs are real, the government knows much more than it’s telling and non-human intelligences behind these craft have already contacted some of us.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

15th Century Painting is Proof of UFO Visit

by Sean Martin                      January 12, 2019                        (express.co.uk)

• “The Annunciation with Saint Emidius”, a painting by Carlo Crivelli which dates back to 1486 (shown below), depicts a UFO in the skies firing down a beam of light to the Virgin Mary. Ancient alien theorists interpret this scene as when the Virgin Mary was impregnated with her son, Jesus Christ. Thus, conspiracy theorists claim that Jesus was actually sent to Earth by a different race from another planet.

• The website Listverse states: “Their belief is that Jesus was not divine at all. Instead, it was the result of genetic engineering and the implanting of a child into the unsuspecting Immaculate Conception.” “Many people who claim to have been abducted (by aliens) state that they were inside their homes when a strange light shone from outside the buildings.”

• However, ufologist Jacques Vallee told Huffington Post that the painting is fictional, and there is no way the artist would know what is in the skies at the time of the supposed conception of Christ as it was painted almost 1500 years later.

• Similarly, the walls of the Svetitskhoveli Cathedral in Mtskheta, Georgia (Eastern Europe) contain an 11th century portrait of Christ being crucified with a large crowd gathered around Him (shown above). But in the top left and right corners are what appear to be dome-shaped flying craft with three trails coming out of each. Theorists claim that this is proof of the existence of alien UFO’s 2000 years ago. Art historians claim that the strange craft actually represent guardian angels.

 

A Painting dating back to the 1400s could prove that aliens coexisted with humans on Earth and may have played a part in the story of the Bible.

“The Annunciation with Saint Emidius” 1486

The paining in question is the “The Annunciation with Saint Emidius,” by Carlo Crivelli which dates back to 1486. In it, a strange object is seen in the skies firing down a beam to the Virgin Mary, supposedly impregnating her with Jesus Christ. While the thin laser-like light was meant to stem from a formation of angels, conspiracy theorists claim it is a UFO firing the beam, and is more proof of ancient aliens.

Conspiracy theorists claim that Jesus was not divine, but was actually sent by a different race from another planet.

The website Listverse states: “Their belief is that Jesus was not divine at all. Instead, it was the result of genetic engineering and the implanting of a child into the unsuspecting Immaculate Conception.

“Supposedly, she was abducted and impregnated by an alien race.They argue that the beam of light striking Mary while she is indoors is consistent with modern-day alien abductions.

“Many people who claim to have been abducted state that they were inside their homes when a strange light shone from outside the buildings.”

However, computer scientist Jacques Vallee told Huffington Post that the painting is fictional, and there is no way the artist would know what is in the skies at the time of the supposed conception of Christ as it was painted almost 1500 years later.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Meet J. Allen Hynek, the Astronomer Who First Classified UFO ‘Close Encounters’

by Greg Daugherty                      November 19, 2018                      (history.com)

• In 1947, a rash of reports of UFOs had the public on edge. The Air Force created Project Sign to investigate these UFO sightings. But they needed outside expertise to sift through the reports and come up with explanations for all of these sightings. Enter J. Allen Hynek.

• In 1948, Hynek was the 37-year-old director at Ohio State University’s McMillin Observatory. He had worked for the government during WWII developing new defense technologies for the war effort with a high security clearance. The Air Force approached him to be a consultant on ‘flying saucers’ for the government. “I had scarcely heard of UFOs in 1948 and, like every other scientist I knew, assumed that they were nonsense,” Hynek recalled.

• Hynek’s UFO investigations under Project Sign resulted in twenty percent of the 237 cases that couldn’t be explained. In February 1949, Project Sign was succeeded by Project Grudge, which said Hynek, “took as its premise that UFOs simply could not be.” The 1949 Grudge report concluded that the phenomena posed no danger to the United States, and warranted no further study.

• But UFO incidents continued, even from the Air Force’s own radar operators. The national media began treating the phenomenon more seriously. The Air Force had little choice but to revive Project Grudge under a new name: Project Blue Book. Hynek joined Project Blue Book in 1952 and would remain with it until its demise in 1969. But he had changed his mind about the existence of UFOs. “The witnesses I interviewed could have been lying, could have been insane or could have been hallucinating collectively—but I do not think so,” he recalled in 1977. Hynek deplored the ridicule that people who reported a UFO sighting often had to endure, causing untold numbers of others to never come forward, not to mention the loss of useful research data.

• “Given the controversial nature of the subject, it’s understandable that both scientists and witnesses are reluctant to come forward,” said Jacques Vallee, co-author with Dr. Hynek of The Edge of Reality: A Progress Report on Unidentified Flying Objects.

• On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union surprised the world by launching Sputnik, a serious blow to Americans’ sense of technological superiority. Hynek was on TV assuring Americans that their scientists were closely monitoring the situation. UFO sightings continued unabated.

• In the 1960s, Hynek was the top expert on UFOs as scientific consultant to Project Blue Book. But he chafed at what he perceived as the project’s mandate to debunk UFO sightings, and the inadequate resources at his disposal. Air Force Major Hector Quintanilla, who headed the project from 1963 to 1969, writes that he considered Hynek a “liability.”

• Hynek frustrated UFO debunkers such as the U.S. Air Force. But in 1966, after suggesting that a UFO sighting in Michigan may have been an optical illusion created by swamp gas, he became a punchline for UFO believers as well.

• In his testimony for a Congressional hearing in 1966, Hynek stated, “[I]t is my opinion that the body of data accumulated since 1948…deserves close scrutiny by a civilian panel of physical and social scientists…”. The Air Force established a civilian committee of scientists to investigate UFOs, chaired by physicist, Dr. Edward U. Condon. In 1968, Hynek assailed the Condon Report’s conclusion that “further extensive study of UFOs probably cannot be justified.” In 1969, Project Blue Book shut down for good.

• UFO sightings continued around the world. Hynek later quipped, “apparently [they] did not read the Condon Report”. Hynek went on with his research, free from the compromises and bullying of the U.S. Air Force.

• In 1972, Hynek published his first book, The UFO Experience. It introduced Hynek’s classifications of UFO incidents, which he called Close Encounters. Close Encounters of the First Kind meant UFOs seen at a close enough range to make out some details. In a Close Encounter of the Second Kind, the UFO had a physical effect, such as scorching trees, frightening animals or causing car motors to suddenly conk out. In Close Encounters of the Third Kind, witnesses reported seeing occupants in or near a UFO.

• In 1977, Steven Spielberg released the movie, Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Hynek was paid $1,000 for the use of the title, another $1,000 for the rights to use stories from the book and $1,500 for three days of technical consulting. He also had a brief cameo in the film, playing an awestruck scientist when the alien spacecraft comes into view.

• In 1978, Hynek retired from teaching. In 1973 he had founded the Center for UFO Studies which continues to this day. Hynek died in 1986, at age 75, from a brain tumor.

 

It’s September 1947, and the U.S. Air Force has a problem. A rash of reports about mysterious objects in the skies has the public on edge and the military baffled. The Air Force needs to figure out what’s going on—and fast. It launches an investigation it calls Project Sign.

By early 1948 the team realizes it needs some outside expertise to sift through the reports it’s receiving—specifically an astronomer who can determine which cases are easily explained by astronomical phenomena, such as planets, stars or meteors.

For J. Allen Hynek, then the 37-year-old director at Ohio State University’s McMillin Observatory, it would be a classic case of being in the right place at the right time—or, as he may have occasionally lamented, the wrong place at the wrong one.

The adventure begins

Hynek had worked for the government during the war, developing new defense technologies like the first radio-controlled fuse, so he already had a high security clearance and was a natural go-to.

“One day I had a visit from several men from the technical center at Wright-Patterson Air Force base, which was only 60 miles away in Dayton,” Hynek later wrote. “With some obvious embarrassment, the men eventually brought up the subject of ‘flying saucers’ and asked me if I would care to serve as consultant to the Air Force on the matter… The job didn’t seem as though it would take too much time, so I agreed.”

Little did Hynek realize that he was about to begin a lifelong odyssey that would make him one of the most famous and, at times, controversial scientists of the 20 century. Nor could he have guessed how much his own thinking about UFOs would change over that period as he persisted in bringing rigorous scientific inquiry to the subject.

“I had scarcely heard of UFOs in 1948 and, like every other scientist I knew, assumed that they were nonsense,” he recalled.

Project Sign ran for a year, during which the team reviewed 237 cases. In Hynek’s final report, he noted that about 32 percent of incidents could be attributed to astronomical phenomena, while another 35 percent had other explanations, such as balloons, rockets, flares or birds. Of the remaining 33 percent, 13 percent didn’t offer enough evidence to yield an explanation. That left 20 percent that provided investigators with some evidence but still couldn’t be explained.

The Air Force was loath to use the term “unidentified flying object,” so the mysterious 20 percent were simply classified as “unidentified.”

In February 1949, Project Sign was succeeded by Project Grudge. While Sign offered at least a pretense of scientific objectivity, Grudge seems to have been dismissive from the start, just as its angry-sounding name suggests. Hynek, who played no role in Project Grudge, said it “took as its premise that UFOs simply could not be.” Perhaps not surprisingly, its report, issued at the end of 1949, concluded that the phenomena posed no danger to the United States, having resulted from mass hysteria, deliberate hoaxes, mental illness or conventional objects that the witnesses had misinterpreted as otherworldly. It also suggested the subject wasn’t worth further study.

Project Blue Book is born

That might’ve been the end of it. But UFO incidents continued, including some puzzling reports from the Air Force’s own radar operators. The national media began treating the phenomenon more seriously; LIFE magazine did a 1952 cover story, and even the widely respected TV journalist Edward R. Murrow devoted a program to the topic, including an interview with Kenneth Arnold, a pilot whose 1947 sighting of mysterious objects over Mount Rainier in Washington state popularized the term “flying saucer.” The Air Force had little choice but to revive Project Grudge, which soon morphed into the more benignly named Project Blue Book.

Hynek joined Project Blue Book in 1952 and would remain with it until its demise in 1969. For him, it was a side gig as he continued to teach and to pursue other, non-UFO research, at Ohio State. In 1960 he moved to Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, to chair its astronomy department.

As before, Hynek’s role was to review the reports of UFO sightings and determine whether there was a logical astronomical explanation. Typically that involved a lot of unglamorous paperwork; but now and then, for an especially puzzling case, he had a chance to get out into the field.

There he discovered something he might never have learned from simply reading the files: how normal the people who reported seeing UFOs tended to be. “The witnesses I interviewed could have been lying, could have been insane or could have been hallucinating collectively—but I do not think so,” he recalled in his 1977 book, The Hynek UFO Report.

“Their standing in the community, their lack of motive for perpetration of a hoax, their own puzzlement at the turn of events they believe they witnessed, and often their great reluctance to speak of the experience—all lend a subjective reality to their UFO experience.”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

  • 1
  • 2

Copyright © 2018 Exopolitics Institute News Service. All Rights Reserved.