Tag: China

by Kalee Brown       October 26, 2017       (collective-evolution.com)

• Eerily similar to an ominous social rating system featured in an episode of the Netflix series Black Mirror, China plans to implement a “Social Credit System” by 2020. The Chinese government describes the system as a method to improve trust nationwide and cultivate a culture of “sincerity”.
• Try to envision a world in which you’re constantly monitored, judged for your actions, and literally evaluated based on every choice you make and action you take. Life becomes one big popularity contest.
• The Chinese will be ranked on different categories, including behavior (time you spend on social media and playing video games), personal preferences (the types of purchases you make and how much debt you have), and interpersonal relationships.
• It’s clear that this ranking system could create a lot of separatism and division, and allow the elite to gain even more special treatment than they already enjoy.
• What happens when you voice your opinion, particularly if it goes against the government’s regime, in hopes of inspiring positive change within society? You could get a lower score, rendering you ‘less trustworthy’ and ultimately affecting:
• – your ability to get a mortgage, a job, a loan, etc.;
• – your eligiblity for public office;
• – your access to social security and welfare;
• – a stricter regulations and “frisking” at Chinese customs;
• – your ability to sleep in a bed in overnight trains or stay in higher-starred hotels and restaurants;
• – your children’s ability to attend expensive private schools.
• If we can no longer challenge our current state of being and question our surroundings, then how can we continue to advance as a collective?
• The irony of this social ranking system was that it forced people to become insincere and disingenuous. Rather than improving their sincerity like China hopes their program will, it will end up encouraging people to simply play a “number’s game,” striving to please others and doing anything they could to fit into society’s norms. The risks far outweigh the potential benefits.

 

Can you imagine a rating system being fully implemented into society that is not only meant to establish your “trustworthiness,” but is available for everyone to see? Well, China is seriously considering doing just that, as detailed in the State Council of China‘s document published in 2014 called “Planning Outline for the Construction of a Social Credit System.”

Though this hierarchal system is currently voluntary, it is set to become mandatory in 2020. If you’re getting sort of a deja-vu feeling, that’s totally understandable. The system China proposed sounds eerily similar to an ominous social rating system featured in an episode of the Netflix series Black Mirror, which depicted a chilling Big-Brother-type, social-media-obsessed future.

First, let’s review the details of China’s social rating system, called the “Social Credit System” (SCS). Try to envision a world in which you’re constantly monitored, judged for your actions, and literally evaluated based on every choice you make and action you take.

There will be different categories that you’ll be ranked on, including behaviour, personal preferences, and interpersonal relationships. From the people you hang out with to the amount of time you spend on social media and playing video games to the types of purchases you make and how much debt you have, the world will know. You can say goodbye to privacy under SCS, because Big Brother is stepping in to monitor your every move.

Of course, a lot of this already happens. Many governments including the U.S. already spy on their citizens, social media platforms like Facebook and Instagram collect an overwhelming amount of information on you, and Google is secretly recording pretty much everything you do. Google keeps the texts/videos you send and literally tracks your every move thanks to your trusty Google Maps app.
The primary issue with the rating system is, not only are they monitoring citizens even more than they do currently, which is already a substantial and arguably inappropriate amount, but they’re labelling their actions as “positive” or “negative” as well. Should we really be comfortable allowing the government to dictate what’s right or wrong?

Sure, there are certain laws that are in place for a reason, but ultimately the government does not always operate in favour of society because they often put the needs of corporations over the needs of their own citizens. Laws are often heavily influenced by corporations whose main goal is profit, not the betterment of humanity as a whole.

Many governments allow corporations like Monsanto to fill our food supply with carcinogenic herbicides, they let Big Pharma influence their drug approval processes and advertise drugs to the public, and they allow the meat and dairy industries to dictate what their food guides deem healthy for our bodies, despite going against doctors’ recommendations.

This is precisely why rating systems in societies could pose a huge problem: We all have different moral compasses. Much of what the government does, you may not support. So, what happens when you voice your opinion, particularly if it goes against the government’s regime, in hopes of inspiring positive change within society? Well, you could get a lower score, rendering you ‘less trustworthy’ and ultimately affecting your ability to get a mortgage, a job, a loan, etc.

Of course, you could decide to speak out against them, and hope your rating wouldn’t affect your overall well-being, but how would that affect your friends’ and family members’ ratings?

The Chinese government has described the system as a method to improve trust nationwide and cultivate a culture of “sincerity.”

The policy reads, “It will forge a public opinion environment where keeping trust is glorious. It will strengthen sincerity in government affairs, commercial sincerity, social sincerity and the construction of judicial credibility.”

According to the policy documents, if you receive a low score on the SCS, then you could face the following penalties:
o You won’t be eligible for positions in public office
o You will no longer have access to social security and welfare
o You’ll face stricter regulations and “frisking” at Chinese customs
o You’ll won’t be able to apply for any senior level positions in the food and drug sector
o You won’t be able to sleep in a bed in overnight trains
o You won’t be able to stay in higher-starred hotels and restaurants and will have more difficulty travelling
o Your children could potentially suffer because they won’t be allowed to attend more expensive private schools

It’s very clear that this ranking system could create a lot of separatism and division, and allow the elite to gain even more special treatment than they already enjoy. This type of hierarchy is in no way conducive to equality, or a society that allows love to lead their decisions. We do not need to implement social ranking systems in order to increase sincerity within society; we simply need to have more compassion for other people and treat them like equals.

The rating systems could seriously halt our personal growth, innovation, and thirst for knowledge as well. The government would be able to see exactly what books you’re reading and what you’re researching, and if it goes against the grain or challenges the current regime, then you could end up with a lower score. How are we going to be able to grow as a society if we don’t question the status quo?

We learn to improve ourselves by challenging the current norms and by stepping outside of our comfort zones. Renewable energy sources seriously threatened big oil and the government, yet this field was able to grow and advance because experts challenged our current energy system. We have made extreme advancements in health care because people found flaws in previous practices and had faith that they could improve them. This can be applied to quite literally every single industry, which is why these ranking systems could negatively affect growth, innovation, and our entire economic system as a whole.

If we can no longer challenge our current state of being and question our surroundings, then how can we continue to advance as a collective? As a collective, many of our strengths lie in our differences. A diverse society includes people with all different strengths and brackets of knowledge, but if we’re all racing to get a better ranking, then we could lose a lot of those differences in trying to become “people pleasers” and adhering to social norms.

How much could we be penalized for our creativity and forward-thinking under social ranking systems? It’s difficult to say. Perhaps there would be some benefits from this particular system being implemented in China, but until it is fully mandatory, we have no way of knowing the exact outcome.

 

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by Arjun Walia October 16, 2017 (collective-evolution.com)

• The topic Extraterrestrial UFOs has exited the realm of “conspiracy theory” and entered into the realm of reality, largely due to the efforts of hundreds of military whistleblowers of all ranks, as well as pilots, professors, astronauts, and world leaders.
• Thousands upon thousands of previously classified documents related to UFOs and potential extraterrestrial beings have been released into the public domain by dozens of governments.
• A CIA document outlines how the agency was gathering intelligence on a joint effort between the USSR and the People’s Republic of China, two decades ago, when scientists from the USSR as well as China initiated a joint study on UFOs.
• A large number of “experiencers” say that these extraterrestrials are concerned with the well-being of our planet.
• In 1994, sixty schoolchildren in Ruwa, Zimbabwe saw multiple hovering spaceships and were shown images of a destroyed Earth in the future unless we collectively, as one human race, turn it around.
• Evidence suggests we have been visited for a long time now. If some type of “invasion” were being planned it probably would have already happened.
• One thing is abundantly clear – something is going on here and some people have known about it for a very long time.

The picture you see above is of a UFO that prompted the complete shutdown of a Chinese airport several years ago. It was covered by multiple mainstream media outlets, despite the fact that they never really do justice to the UFO phenomena. UFOs shutting down airports is nothing new, it’s happened multiple times, with the best example in North America being the “O’Hare” incident. Look it up if interested.

“I must say that if your listeners could see for themselves the mass of reports coming in from airborne gendarmerie, and from the gendarmerie charged with the job of conducting investigations, all of which reports are being forwarded by us to the CNES (National Center for Space Studies), then they would see that it is all pretty disturbing.” – Former French Minister of Defense Robert Galley (Dolan, Richard. UFOs For the 21st Century Mind: New York: Richard Dolan Press, 2014.)

Thousands upon thousands of previously classified documents related to UFOs and potential extraterrestrial beings have been released into the public domain by dozens of governments, as well as several Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. In the United States, the NSA, CIA, and FBI have done the same, proving that these agencies put significant resources toward studying this phenomenon. The topic has exited the realm of “conspiracy theory” and entered into the realm of reality, largely due to the efforts of hundreds of military whistleblowers of all ranks, as well as politicians and academics. We’re talking about generals, pilots, professors, astronauts, world leaders, and more. If one thing is abundantly clear, it’s that something is going on here, and some people have known about it for a very long time.

It’s no secret that countries spy on each other, and use a variety of methods to do so. Take the American government’s STARGATE project, for example, which investigated parapsychology and then used their findings to spy on other countries. Of course, we can’t forget about the Snowden leaks, which showed how the U.S. government actively spies on not only their own citizens, but also on major corporations, financial institutions, and other countries.

When it comes to the topic of UFOs, this is no exception. Multiple governments have black budget operations, referred to Unacknowledged Special Access Programs (SAPs) in the United States, and they have absolutely zero oversight from Congress.

A document found online in the CIA’s electronic reading room outlines how the CIA was gathering intelligence on a joint effort between the USSR and the People’s Republic of China (PRC). This was almost two decades ago, when scientists from the USSR as well as the PRC initiated a joint study on UFOs, and stands as yet another document showing how seriously global governments have investigated UFOs throughout history:

Scientists of the PRC and the Soviet Far East have begun joint study of UFO’s. The first meeting of ufologists of the two countries has ended in the small maritime townlet of Dalnegorsk. The Soviet and Chinese specialists on anomalous phenomena have mapped out a program for investigating incidents that are already known and have also arranged to directly exchange video and photographic materials on new similar phenomena. Dalnegorsk has not been chosen by chance as the place for such acquaintance. In the last few years the number of cases of visual observation of UFO’s has noticeably increased there. In just the last four years alone no less than 10 UFO’s have been recorded. Specialists link their heightened interest in places here with the variety and wealth of useful minerals in Maritime Kray.

Similar, incidents have also occurred in mountainous regions in China whose climatic conditions and natural landscape resemble our own.

“Everything is in a process of investigation both in the United States and in Spain, as well as the rest of the world. The nations of the world are currently working together in the investigation of the UFO phenomenon. There is an international exchange of data.” – General Carlos Castro Cavero (1979).

If The Extraterrestrial Hypothesis Is True, What Are They Interested In and Why Are They Here?
“Decades ago, visitors from other planets warned us about the direction we were heading and offered to help. Instead, some of us interpreted their visits as a threat, and decided to shoot first and ask questions after.” – Former Canadian Defense Minister Paul Hellyer.

The document above was definitely an interesting find, particularly because it reveals that the experts who gathered in this joint effort linked the presence of these beings to the natural resources in the area. Now, if you’re thinking that extraterrestrials are going to invade us and use our planet for our resources, you’re probably incorrect. Why? Because the evidence suggests we have been being visited for a long time now. If some type of “invasion” were being planned, like the ones commonly portrayed in movies and television, it probably would have already happened.

It was also an interesting find for me personally because I’ve been researching this topic for a long time and have come across several stories regarding extraterrestrial craft landing, humanoid bodies exiting the vehicle, and the beings taking rocks and plants, almost like an ET scientist exploring our planet.

Other “experiencers” have also suggested many of these extraterrestrials are actually concerned with the well-being of our planet. This has been the sentiment of a large number of people who claim to have contact experiences, or telepathic experiences with extraterrestrial beings.

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by Mary Hui October 16, 2017 (washingtonpost.com)

• China’s prototype space station, launched in 2011, is out of control and will crash somewhere on the Earth before the end of the year.
• The space station measures 34 feet and weighs 8.5 tons.
• Chunks as large as 220 lbs may hit the Earth.
• Controlled spacecraft are typically guided to crash in a 2.5 mile-deep spot in the Pacific Ocean, 3000 miles east of New Zealand, known as the “spacecraft cemetery” where more than 263 derelict spacecraft have been dumped.
• China currently has a second space station in orbit and plans to have a permanent space station by 2020.

Sometime within the next few months, the heavens will come crashing down.

Tiangong 1, which translates to “Heavenly Palace,” is China’s first space laboratory, launched in September 2011, serving as a prototype for a permanent space station that it aims to eventually build and launch. But six years after it first went into orbit, the 8½-ton laboratory is soon expected to meet a fiery and uncontrolled end, hurtling down to Earth and crashing somewhere — anywhere — on the planet.

In September 2016, Chinese officials confirmed that they had lost control of the space lab and that it would crash into Earth sometime in the latter half of 2017. In May, China told the United Nations that the lab would reenter Earth between October and April 2018.

Much of the space lab, which measures 34 feet in length, is expected to burn up during its reentry. But Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist from Harvard University, told the Guardian that pieces weighing up to 220 pounds could make it to the Earth’s surface.

Where exactly the craft will fall is anyone’s guess. Even slight changes in atmospheric conditions can alter the landing site “from one continent to the next,” McDowell told the Guardian.

“You really can’t steer these things,” he said. “Even a couple of days before it reenters, we probably won’t know better than six or seven hours, plus or minus, when it’s going to come down. Not knowing when it’s going to come down translates as not knowing where it’s going to come down.”

Uncontrolled crashes of larger spacecraft, while rare, have happened before. The Soviet Salyut 7 space station crashed to Earth in 1991, while NASA’s Skylab space station fell over Western Australia in 1979.

China launched Tiangong 2, its second experimental station, in September 2016. China is aiming to have a permanently manned space station in orbit by 2020.

The 2011 launch of Tiangong 1 was seen by some as a “potent political symbol” that marked an important step forward in China’s expanding space program. It was regarded as a geopolitically significant event, part of China’s broader space program through which it wants to assert its emergence as a new superpower.

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