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UFO Sightings May Be Falling, but Congress is Still Paying Attention

by Nick Pope                  October 15, 2018                     (theguardian.com)

• The Senate Armed Services Committee of the U.S. Congress is looking into a 2004 incident where US Navy pilots flying with the USS Nimitz strike group encountered, chased and filmed fast-moving unidentified objects. Reliable sources say at least two of the military pilots involved have already been interviewed. The House Armed Services Committee also received a DIA briefing on the Pentagon’s “Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program” UFO project.

• The AATIP was the brainchild of the then Senate majority leader Harry Reid, and much of the work was contracted out to Bigelow Aerospace, run by former budget hotel magnate and believer in extraterrestrial visitation, Robert Bigelow. Now, some of the people formerly involved with the project, including the DIA official who ran it, Luis Elizondo, have joined “To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science”, fronted by Tom DeLonge, the former vocalist/guitarist of the pop punk band Blink-182. Their mission is “to explore exotic science and technologies … that can change the world”.

• The UFO phenomenon should not be judged by number of sightings, which has decreased, but by the compelling nature of the evidence: reports from pilots on different flights; visual sightings corroborated by radar; photos and videos regarded as genuinely intriguing by intelligence community. The term “UFO” itself has become as obsolete, usually referring to an extraterrestrial “flying saucer”, which may or may not be the case. The new “Unidentified Aerial Phenomena” (UAPs) is a term not automatically associated with ETs.

• But Congress needs to get past debates over terminology and statistical analyses to focus more on the quality of reports in a far more meaningful assessment of the phenomenon. Irrespective of the outcome, these might turn out to be the most fascinating Congressional hearings in history.


There’s renewed interest in the UFO phenomenon and it’s coming from an unexpected source: the United States Congress.

The Senate Armed Services Committee is looking into a 2004 incident where US Navy pilots flying with the USS Nimitz strike group encountered, chased and filmed fast-moving unidentified objects. Reliable sources say at least two of the military pilots involved have already been interviewed, and a radar operator was subsequently invited to get in touch.

  Nick Pope and wife, Dr Elizabeth Weiss

In parallel, the House Armed Services Committee is taking an interest. Records from April show the committee received a Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) briefing on the Pentagon’s UFO project, the cryptically-named AATIP. We know so little about AATIP that there’s even dispute over whether the acronym stands for Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program or Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program. The very existence of the project caused a sensation, because until the New York Times broke the story in December 2017, the US government claimed it had not investigated UFOs since the 1960s when sightings were looked at in a study called Project Blue Book.

As noted in the Guardian recently, data from two civilian UFO research organisations show that the number of reported sightings has fallen in recent years. However, there’s no single, global focal point for reports (the Ministry of Defence stopped investigating UFOs in 2009) and statistics will never tell the full story.

It would be better if the phenomenon were assessed and judged not on numbers alone, but by focusing on cases where we have compelling evidence: independently submitted reports from pilots on different flights; visual sightings corroborated by radar; photos and videos regarded as genuinely intriguing by intelligence community imagery analysts. Irrespective of the methodology we use to assess the phenomenon, how can we do so in an even-handed way when the subject has so much pop culture baggage?

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Are the U.S. Space Forces Starting to Muster?

by John Breeden II                 October 2, 2018                   (nextgov.com)

• With all of the proposals for space-based operations being bandied about in Washington D.C., who is doing what in space?

Space Force – A entirely new and separate branch of the U.S. military, proposed by President Trump. Such a specialized space force could maintain the current technological advantage that the United States may have over China and Russia. A recent proposal by Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan called for a tight integration between the new Space Force and the National Reconnaissance Office to gather intelligence using satellites. According to an Air Force memo, a new Space Force would initially require 13,000 new personnel and cost $13 billion over the next five years, including $2.2 billion in order to set up a headquarters and $7.2 billion for new assets and equipment.

NASA – The U.S.’s “peaceful” space program, NASA has recently launched a new effort to search for extraterrestrial, intelligent life known as the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).

Space Corps – The 2017 version of Trump’s Space Force that was included in the House of Representative’s fiscal 2018 National Defense Authorization Act, but was voted down in the Senate.

Space Command – An alternative to the Space Corps, led by the U.S. Air Force, that would integrate space-based assets, such as military satellites, into the future operations of all branches of service through the development of a Multi-Domain Command and Control system. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is already developing a program called ‘Hallmark’ that will provide better situational awareness in space, especially in the lower Earth orbit zones, which are cluttered with everything from satellites to space junk.

Strategic Support Force – The Chinese operations center that manages its space program, cyberspace and electronic warfare.

[Editor’s Note] Here are some past ExoNews articles on President Trump’s Space Force:
House Panel Lays Foundation for Future Space Force  May 14, 2018
Trump Directs DOD to Establish a Space Force in a Surprise Announcement  Jun 18, 2018
Pence Details Plan for Creation of Space Force in What Would Be the Sixth Branch of the Military  August 9, 2018
New Pentagon Memo Lays Out Action Plan to Establish Space Force by 2020  September 13, 2018

 

When President Donald Trump proposed creating the Space Force as a separate branch of the military, quite a few people ended up scratching their heads. While it would be cool to have a bunch of sleek spaceships like in Star Trek, the sad truth is that we are probably decades or even centuries away from anything close to technology like that, if we ever get there at all. Looked at pessimistically, we would get about as much value out of creating a military branch of time travelers, let’s call them Paladins of the Past, charged with protecting our history from temporal manipulation. It might make for great sci-fi but would not offer much practical value.

We also already have the most advanced, peaceful space program in the world through NASA. Just this spring they launched TESS, the short name for the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, which is bristling with artificial intelligence designed to optimize the search for extraterrestrial, intelligent life. Nobody else is even close to something like TESS.

But NASA works on peaceful projects, and the idea of a militarized space force has been kicked around Washington for a while. The House included such a provision in the fiscal 2018 National Defense Authorization Act, calling the new military branch the “Space Corps.” That idea died in the Senate, though the Defense Department was asked to study the issue.

Trump’s support has given the idea new life, and the Air Force was asked to take the lead on proposing what an independent space command might look like. Previously, the Air Force’s focus was on integrating space-based assets, such as military satellites, into the future operations of all branches of service. They have been working on developing a Multi-Domain Command and Control system which would accomplish that.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Alien Disclosure – Amnesty – Book Review

Alien Disclosure is a science fiction book based on a real-life event involving President Dwight Eisenhower meeting with an extraterrestrial delegation in February 1954. The author, Allan Kules, weaves a fascinating story of how a UFO researcher gets his hands on a copy of the film taken of the meeting, evades a secret government effort to capture him, and eventually takes it to the United Nations where it is played thereby disclosing the truth to the world.

Available at Amazon.com

The book’s plot provides an intriguing example of how full disclosure can be triggered by a positive faction of the secret government providing UFO/exopolitics researchers with leaked documents of real events. The first time this happened occurred in the 1980’s and 1990’s with the leaked Majestic Documents, and could easily happen again with a Wikileaks type release of UFO/extraterrestrial related documents.

In Alien Disclosure, a positive secret government faction arranges for the Eisenhower film to be given to the hero, James Broadhurst, and this group helps him to evade a negative faction. He was chosen because of his firm belief that amnesty would need to be given to all those involved in maintaining the secrecy system.

While on the run, Broadhurst gets to meet with human looking extraterrestrials that have infiltrated Earth society, who are also behind the full disclosure initiative. He also gets to witness some of the advanced technologies used by the secret government such as teleportation, and is taken for a ride on an extraterrestrial spacecraft.  

What I found especially helpful was the way the negative secret government faction was depicted. The villains were not dehumanized as psychopaths on a rampage of destruction as they carried out illegal orders, but as typical government agents with a highly skewed national security belief system that made them view extraterrestrial disclosure as a genuine threat for human society.

This made it easier to understand why amnesty, based on the Truth and Reconciliation model used by countries such as South Africa, could be used in a full disclosure scenario. Amnesty is going to be a controversial topic as the full enormity of what has been kept secret, and how the secrecy system has been ruthlessly enforced for over seven decades is eventually disclosed.

Kules’ book presents the pros and cons of an amnesty policy when it comes to full disclosure, and why amnesty is critical in getting the negative secret government faction to stand down. In our world today, there is little doubt that the advanced technologies possessed by the secret government could cause enormous destruction if unleashed by those backed into a corner with no other option.

Yet, as we are seeing with the QAnon movement, there are over 50,000 sealed indictments that have been issued against Deep State officials. The threat of being subjected to a military trial makes for a big motivator in getting cooperation from them. If QAnon is to be believed, the Deep State is on the verge of collapse.  So why would blanket amnesty be necessary for the perpetrators of crimes stretching back decades?

Would a “restorative justice” model based on Truth and Reconciliation be better than a “punitive justice” model in dealing with the complex legal and political issues raised by full disclosure? There are pros and cons with both models.

In the case of the Truth and Reconciliation model used in South Africa, many felt that the truths revealed in the process helped bring closure to the victims and/or their families, while others believed that the perpetrators of atrocious crimes were treated far too leniently, and literally got away with murder.

In the case of the Nuremburg War Crimes, while a few senior Nazi officials were punished, the vast majority escaped punishment since evidence was systematically destroyed, and/or such officials went underground to escape justice.

I believe the answer lies in finding some balance between these two justice models since those responsible for the most egregious crimes should be exposed and punished as occurred at Nuremberg. Yet, it’s clear that in the vast majority of cases, where evidence is lacking, a Truth and Reconciliation process has clear advantages. Furthermore, we the victims of such crimes need to move on into a post-disclosure world and forgiveness appears to be an important rite of passage into what lies ahead.

Kules’ book offers many insights into how the full disclosure process might play out, and how the world will react to the truth about extraterrestrial visitors, release of advanced technologies, and the exposure of those who brutally enforced the secrecy system.

Alien Agenda is a very entertaining read, with lots of fascinating plot turns, and inspires the imagination to think about how full disclosure will happen – something that is vital to how it all eventually unfolds.

On a personal level, I was gratified to see how my own research on the 1954 Eisenhower extraterrestrial meeting inspired Kules to write his book. The meeting was a formative event in world history that has been largely ignored by UFO researchers. The multiple diplomatic meetings Eisenhower had with alien ambassadors throughout his administration has shaped the nature of U.S. and world politics ever since.

One area that Kules’ book didn’t cover, is the existence of a German Secret Space Program operating out of Antarctica, which has morphed over the decades with corporate assistance into something quite sinister that operates in parallel with alien contact. Perhaps this is something he will cover later in his Alien Disclosure Trilogy.

I highly recommend Alien Disclosure: Amnesty as a book well worth reading. It is available on Amazon as a paperback and would make an ideal gift for those interested in science fiction, and have an open mind to the truth about extraterrestrial visitation.

© Michael E. Salla, Ph.D. Copyright Notice

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