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ET Nanotech Used to Control Humans

by Paul Harper                 August 5, 2018                    (dailystar.co.uk)

• Dr. Roger Leir is a well-known Ufologist who claims to have removed “16 alien implants”. In independent filmmaker Jeremy Corbell’s new documentary, “Patient Seventeen”, Corbell follow Dr. Leir as he removes an alien implant from a seventeenth patient. Patient Seventeen believes he has had several experiences with intelligent lifeforms not from this planet, a claim made by more than three million Americans.

• Footage shows the patient’s surgery and then the results of scientific testing of the minute implant. Scientist Steve Colbern claims that the implant is made up of 36 elements, many of which are reportedly not found on Earth. “It’s probably a sophisticated nanotechnological device,” says Colbern.

• Nanophysicist Chris Cooper remarks, “There is nothing I can imagine that could explain why this man would have a witch’s brew of elements within a sample embedded in his leg.” “This is the most astounding array of elements in a simple sample I’ve ever seen.”

• Dr. Leir believes that the implanted device emits “scalar waves”, i.e.: electromagnetic radiation that could potentially be used for communication. Dr. Leir is convinced that the device “did not come from our solar system, much less the Earth”.

• The filmmaker asked Dr. Leir if he was sure that he wanted him to film his work. Leir said, “Yes, Jeremy. I’ve been doing this for more than two decades, and there’s something to this!” Corbell told Dr. Leir that he would film his surgery, “but if he was lying, bending the truth or trying to deceive the public in any way by altering his results, that I was going to out him.”

• “I might be sitting on the most astounding physical evidence of an off-world, non-terrestrial nanotechnological device from an advanced Alien intelligence,” exclaimed Corbell. As for Patient Seventeen, “I just want this to end, I just want it removed. ‘This is scarier than hell.”

 

The production is named after the 17 reported patients helped by a Dr Roger Leir, a well-known Ufologist, who alleges he has removed “16 alien implants”.

Dr. Roger Leir

Patient Seventeen believes he has had several experiences with intelligent lifeforms not from this planet, a claim made by more than three million Americans who suffer from what’s called “alien abduction syndrome”.

Jeremy Corbell

The unidentified man said he never realised that there was a tiny metal object – the size of the “end of a matchstick” – in his leg,  which is suggested was secretly inserted during an ET encounter.

“I just want this to end, I just want it removed,” he tells the camera.

“This is scarier than hell.”

Footage shows the patient’s surgery and then the results of scientific testing of the minute implant, which Dr Leir is convinced “did not come from our solar system, much less the Earth”.

Scientist Steve Colbern claims that the implant is made up of 36 elements, many of which are reportedly not traditionally found on Earth.

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How U.F.O.s ‘Exploded’ Into Public View

by Laura M. Holson                   August 3, 2018                      (nytimes.com)

• Starting around 11:40 p.m. on July 19, 1952, air traffic controllers at Washington National Airport noticed radar blips speeding near Andrews Air Force Base. The unidentified aircrafts fanned out, flying over the White House and the U.S. Capitol (see photo image above). They vanished around 5 a.m. That morning, Capt. S.C. “Casey” Pierman was leaving Washington National Airport bound for Detroit. Air traffic control told Pierman to follow the unidentified flying objects. Flying over West Virginia, Pierman reported tracking as many as seven bluish-white lights.

• A week later on July 26th, unidentified radar blips were again spotted on radar at Washington National Airport. The Air Force dispatched jet fighters to intercept the flying objects. But every time one of the jets closed in, they disappeared. When the jets backed off, they reappeared. At one point, a pilot found himself in the midst of four unidentified aircrafts and asked what to do. Air control were speechless. Suddenly the objects began to move away. The pilot radioed, ‘They’re gone,” and returned to his base.

• Pentagon spokesman at the time, Albert Chop, told the press that “These things hung around all night long.” The next day, almost every major newspaper wrote about the UFOs. “‘Objects’ Outstrip Jets Over Capital,” was the headline in The New York Times.

• The Air Force and the CIA became worried that the Soviet Union would take advantage of the situation and launch an attack on the United States. Worse, no one could explain the phenomenon to President Harry Truman.

• On July 29, 1952, Maj. Gen. John Samford, the director of Air Force intelligence overseeing the inquiry, held a news conference to reassure the public. He dismissed the Washington sightings as a temperature anomaly. Still, the general conceded that not all the details could be explained by natural causes. Witness reports “have been made by credible observers of relatively incredible things,” he said at the time. The New York Times ran the headline “Air Force Debunks ‘Saucers’ as Just ‘Natural Phenomena.’”

• In January 1953, a scientific committee led by Howard Robertson, a well-known mathematician and physicist, was formed by the government to explore the phenomenon. “One of the conclusions was that they needed to debunk UFOs,” said former Army Lt Col. Kevin Randle, who has written a book on the incident, Invasion Washington: U.F.O.s Over the Capitol. The ‘Robertson Panel’ suggested that the government conduct a mass media education campaign to “reduce the current gullibility of the public and consequently their susceptibility to clever hostile propaganda.” The re-education campaign did not work. Few were convinced by the government’s explanation, and UFOs have persisted in pop culture.

• Government officials have sought to publicly debunk the existence of alien evidence ever since the 1952 Washington sightings. Nevertheless, the topic is back in the headlines. Last year, The New York Times wrote about a little known Pentagon project, the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, founded in 2007 to investigate UFO sightings. A search of The NY Times’s historical archives reveals a rich bounty of UFO sightings, lore and explanations since the 1950s. And who can forget in 2016 when Hillary Clinton said she would reopen the real X-files if she were president?

[Editor’s Note]  According to sources such as Corey Goode and William Tompkins, the UFOs that buzzed Washington D.C. in the summer of 1952 were actually Nazi spacecraft from Antarctica.  After these incidents, President Eisenhower and the U.S. military were pressured into negotiating a truce with the Nazi faction, ultimately clearing the way for a cooperative treaty between the highly advanced Nazi group and the U.S. military industrial complex which endures even today. 

 

In the early morning of July 20, 1952, Capt. S.C. “Casey” Pierman was ready for takeoff at Washington National Airport, when a bright light skimmed the horizon and disappeared. He did not think much of it until he was airborne, bound for Detroit, and an air traffic controller told him two or three unidentified flying objects were spotted on radar traveling at high speed.

The controller told Captain Pierman to follow them, the pilot told government investigators at the time. Captain Pierman agreed, and headed northwest over West Virginia where he saw as many as seven bluish-white lights that looked “like falling stars without tails,” according to a newspaper report.

The sighting of whatever-they-were garnered headlines around the world. And in the decades since, U.F.O.s have become part of the pop culture zeitgeist, from “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” to “The X-Files.” In September, a star of that long-running series, Gillian Anderson, will appear in “UFO,” a movie about a college student haunted by sightings of flying saucers. A “Men in Black” remake is in the works. And the History Channel plans to air “Project Blue Book,” a scripted series about the government program that studied whether U.F.O.s were a national threat.

And the topic is back in the headlines. Last year, The Times wrote about a little known project founded in 2007, the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, to investigate U.F.O. sightings. A search of The Times’s historical archives reveals a rich bounty of U.F.O. sightings, lore and explanations since the 1950s. And who can forget in 2016 when Hillary Clinton said she would reopen the real X-files if she were president?

Captain Pierman’s 68-year-old daughter, Faith McClory, said in an interview last month that her father became something of a celebrity as reports like his in the summer of 1952 fueled fear of a space alien invasion.

“My sister has memories of men coming to our home,” said Ms. McClory, who grew up in Belleville, Mich. (She said they were reporters.) “People were enthralled with the flying saucers,” she added.
Researchers say government officials have sought to publicly debunk the existence of alien evidence ever since the Washington sightings.

“Unidentified flying objects exploded into the public consciousness then,” said Mark Rodeghier, the scientific director for the Center for UFO Studies, a group of scientists and researchers who study the U.F.O. phenomenon. “There was concern in a way you hadn’t seen before.”

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“Calling All Earthlings” Changes The Course of Time

by Tony Sokol                       August 2, 2018                        (denofgeek.com)

Calling All Earthlings, a documentary film on the life of UFO/ET experiencer, George Van Tassel, opened August 1st at the Maysles Documentary Center in Harlem, New York City. Van Tassel was a former aircraft mechanic who opened a small airport and cafe in the desert town of Landers, California, adjacent to a “Big Rock” considered sacred by Native Americans. In the documentary, social scientists and futurists Dr. J.J. Hurtak and his wife Dr. Desiree Hurtak give running commentary, and a medium channels Van Tassel’s spirit.

• On August 24, 1953, Van Tassel was awakened by a man from Venus named Solganda who looked human and spoke English. The man gave Van Tassel blueprints for a wooden dome that spins and creates a powerful electromagnetic field which creates anti-gravity and time travel, and promotes human health through cellular rejuvenation. Van Tassel also incorporated the writings of Nikola Tesla to come up with the structure known as “The Integratron” (shown above). Made without nails or screws that could with the machine’s conductive properties, the structure is ringed by a rotating wheel of metal spikes. He chose the site in the Mojave Desert north of Joshua Tree National Park for the structure because of its proximity to magnetic vortices and its relationship to the Great Pyramids in Giza. Mostly paid for by Howard Hughes, it took Van Tassel 18 years to build The Integratron.

• The FBI considered Van Tassel a “mental case,” according to declassified files used in the documentary, and scoffed at the belief that communication with extraterrestrials was possible. But the agency also wondered whether the annual Giant Rock Interplanetary Spacecraft Convention, which Van Tassel hosted for over 20 years, was a commie front.

• Van Tassel died mysteriously in 1978, and his papers thereafter disappeared.

 

Mystery, murder and meditation meet aliens, federal agents and time travel in Calling All Earthlings. The documentary follows George Van Tassel, who mixed alien intelligence with the writings of inventor Nikola Tesla to come up with The Integratron, a time machine powered by electromagnetic energy. The documentary opens with a collage of witnesses testifying to strange lights, craft, and creatures with glowing red eyes, and then gets weird.

George Van Tassel

Tassel was far ahead of his time, both technologically and socially. He started at spiritual UFO cult which was stalked by busybodies worried about chants of love, peace and prosperity, while the FBI worked to infiltrate and influence the Integratron intelligentsia against their communistic ideas about free energy. Jack Parsons, the black magic rocket scientist who worked with the Great Beast Aleister Crowley and L. Ron Hubbard, explored free love as part of rocketry’s Suicide Club. But offering free energy proves more dangerous than a Babalon Working for Tassel.

Tassel was a former aircraft mechanic and inspector. He opened a small airport and cafe in the desert town of Landers, California, where some good smoke was being puffed, according to one of the locals interviewed. He set up shop next to a big rock considered sacred by Native Americans.

Tassel began the communication that led to the basic blueprints for the machine on August 24, 1953, when he was woken up by a man named Solganda who looked human and spoke English. The man from Venus gave Tassel plans for a dome that spins and creates a powerful electromagnetic field which promotes cellular rejuvenation allowing Van Tassel to grow old and wise enough to save humanity.

“Dedicated to Research in Life Extension,” the Integratron built as a “a time machine for basic research on rejuvenation, anti-gravity, and time travel.” The site in the Mojave Desert was chosen because of its proximity to magnetic vortices and its relationship to the Great Pyramids in Giza. The 21st century version of Moses’ Tabernacle is held down by a donut of cement that forms a small oculus at the apex of the dome. The structure is ringed by a rotating wheel of metal spikes. The two-story wooden building was metal-free. There were no nails or screws used because they could have interfered with the machine’s conductive properties. He also inadvertently invented Ikea.

It took Tassel 18 years to build the dome about 20 miles north of Joshua Tree National Park. The work was paid for by covert payments from legendary recluse Howard Hughes, members of Van Tassel’s Ministry of Universal Wisdom, Inc., and revenue from an annual Interplanetary Spacecraft Convention.

1:36 minute movie trailer for “Calling All Earthlings”

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