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 The narrative in the UFO community is that the Government hides UFO information. It reflects a real situation but the way it is reinforced is also quite dogmatic and part of a much preferred “us vs them” tendency present in most human interactions especially when there is a communicative distance between individuals in different groups. This is why, when elements of the Government (for whatever reason) allow a way to release formerly classified UFO information to the public it doesn’t spread like wildfire inside the UFO community. It contradicts the narrative that defines us.
 
Then again, the perception in the general population is that UFOs are not terribly important but, instead, mostly a matter of curiosity or entertainment. Psychology and social narratives play strong cards in all this. It is quite irrational as, in order to avoid cognitive dissonance, we select under the phenomenon of confirmation bias what we admit as legitimate into our ego awareness.
 
That situation may express as an apathy which involves a lack of political will permitting an easy cover-up and for those obliged (for national security purposes) to get involved naturally do it in a secretive way. They (and usually the mass media) assume the role of “social superego units” ( a Freudian extrapolation) protecting the need to disbelief which a large chunk of the population feels about taking the issue of an actual extraterrestrial presence seriously.
 
But the apathy that often accompanies the internal uneasiness can change as narratives change and, thus, a more intelligent public recognition can also happen. However, subconsciously, most people need validation from authorities and from a majority of peers telling them that it is OK to accept a truly different perspective. And – indeed – the times-are-a-changing as pro-disclosure information sources coalesce. 
 
In fact, we are in a historical moment right now. All of humanity is into the disclosure in some way or another. Not just the ETs, secret Government, concerned citizens, including experiencers.  All of us together – if we relate – form a dynamic unit in an inner space of meaningfulness and consciousness, even the uninformed and the apathetic. Thus, it cannot be a productive “us vs them” relationship.
 
It is – at the very least – a three-in-one relationship. An old relationship. Inseparable in terms of the collective consciousness on this planet: The Government (secret or not), the citizens and the intelligences we often call “extraterrestrials” altogether equal an integrated or a dysfunctional interactive awareness.  Even if its has often been an “us vs them”relationship disclosure and open communication with the cosmos requires a more integrated relationship. And, as I see it, the incipient, but sufficiently formal and unequivocal revelations through To the Stars Academy change the equation, facilitating further integration of the 3 factors.
 
The challenge of Exopolitics (whether Earth-centered around human responses to the extraterrestrial presence or focused on cosmic legal, political relationships affecting Earth and humanity) as per making sense of the ET presence and relating well with it is inseparable from the challenge of our narratives and attitudes.
 
In the inner space of meaning, the feeling of connectedness or of disconnection affecting the integration of the 3 factors (Government, Citizens, Extraterrestrials) is crucial and this is why treating the ET presence only under an analytical process is insufficient. At least some of them (or perhaps most) getting through to interact with humanity must be understood as friends we can relate with. They must become part of our “we.” And this is why we must not try to control it all but also allow the voices of experiencers having harmonious, mutually respectful experiences to be heard. 
 
 
 

by Sandra Erwin            January 18, 2018                (spacenews.com)

• Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan (in photo above) will be taking on the duties of space adviser that previously resided with the secretary of the Air Force, according to a Jan. 17 memorandum sent to Defense Department military and civilian leaders. Shanahan will assume oversight of the military space portfolio that previously resided with the secretary of the Air Force.
• This move, and the Air Force’s recent establishment of a three-star vice commander of Air Force Space Command are the first steps to implementing and embracing congressional direction on changes to the space enterprise, pursuant to the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act.
• The National Space Defense Center will be transitioned from an experiment to a functioning command center in support of joint and interagency space capabilities.
• Shanahan will also engage a federally funded think tank not affiliated with the Air Force to study the pros and cons of having a separate military department responsible for the national security space activities of the Department of Defense.

 

Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan will be taking on the duties of space adviser that previously resided with the secretary of the Air Force, according to a Jan. 17 memorandum sent to Defense Department military and civilian leaders.

In the memo, titled “Guidance for Increasing Lethality and Warfighting Readiness in Space,” Shanahan lists a number of changes that will be made to the management and organization of the national security space enterprise.

The most important shift is Shanahan assuming the oversight of the military space portfolio that previously resided with the secretary of the Air Force. Shanahan’s memo was written in accordance with Section 1601 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018.

In a related action also aimed at complying with NDAA provisions, the Air Force moved to establish a three-star vice commander of Air Force Space Command resident in the National Capital Region.

These are the “first steps to implementing and embracing congressional direction on changes to the space enterprise,” said space industry consultant Mike Tierney, of Jacques & Associates, who reviewed the memo on Thursday.

The memo makes it clear that the Air Force is not losing any of its Title 10 authorities. Title 10 of the U.S. Code provides the legal basis for the roles, missions and organization of each of the military services. “The department of the Air Force will continue to be principally responsible for organizing, training, equipping and presenting ready Air Force space forces to combatant commanders.”

The memo directs immediate implementation of the following changes:
The position and office of the Principal DoD Space Advisor are terminated and the duties responsibilities, personnel and resources of that office will be transferred to Shanahan on an interim basis. Current PDSA Director Dr. John Stopher will lead the staff and report directly to Shanahan.

The commander of Air Force Space Command will serve a term of at least six years and serve as a Joint Functional Component Commander under the commander of U.S. Strategic Command. Air Force Space Command will consult with the DoD chief information officer to “evaluate, develop, and make recommendations on the procurement of commercial satellite communications services and provide any recommendations to the Deputy Secretary of Defense by August 1, 2018.”

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by Sandra Erwin              January 18, 2018                (spacenews.com )

• The Trump administration’s nominee for the position of undersecretary of defense for research and engineering, Michael Griffin (in photo above), told the Senate Armed Services Committee that the U.S. military can no longer count on having technological dominance. The shift in the spread of global technology “demands that we reassert our technological leadership,” said Griffin. “Our most pressing challenge will be to field new capabilities faster than our adversaries, and faster than has been the case for decades.”
• As undersecretary of defense for research and engineering, Griffin would be dual-hatted as chief technology officer of the Department of Defense.
• Griffin said the Pentagon currently faces the “most technically challenging future defense environment we have seen since the Cold War.” The Pentagon’s number one priority should be the “rapid incorporation of those technologies into new military capabilities.” The Pentagon needs to “maintain and enhance military superiority in space.”
• William Roper, the administration’s nominee for assistant secretary of the Air Force for acquisition added that commercial technologies are on a path to “revolutionize warfare,” particularly artificial intelligence, machine learning and autonomy.
• The Defense Department already represents over 50 percent of U.S. government expenditures in research and development.
[Editor’s Note] This seems to be heading right down the path that Dr. Salla warned us about in a December 24, 2017 article, where the Air Force will use this opportunity to funnel billions of dollars into building up a lower-level military space program as part of an officially sanctioned “soft disclosure”, without revealing the much larger and far more advanced U.S. Navy-controlled Solar Warden space program that has been in existence since the 1980’s. Said Dr. Salla, “I’m sure major US defense contractors are salivating at the prospect of building fleets of armed antigravity spacecraft to respond to a contrived Russian (and Chinese) threat to US national security through a secret space program.”

 

The United States military can no longer count on having technological dominance over its adversaries. For the Pentagon, this is a pivotal moment that demands bold action, said Michael Griffin, the Trump administration’s nominee for the position of undersecretary of defense for research and engineering.
Global spread of technology that the Pentagon used to own exclusively has shifted the balance of power, a situation that “demands that we reassert our technological leadership,” Griffin told the Senate Armed Services Committee Thursday during a confirmation hearing for a slate of Pentagon nominees.

“Our adversaries are leveraging nearly universal access to technology and exploiting our own scientific and technological advances to threaten our deployed forces, our allies and the national and economic security of our nation,” Griffin said.

Griffin had made a similar point in written answers to questions submitted to the committee. “Our most pressing challenge will be to field new capabilities faster than our adversaries, and faster than has been the case for decades,” he wrote.

Although the Pentagon is no longer the biggest player in technology, it nonetheless has significant talent in its national labs, the defense and commercial industrial base, and in academic institutions, Griffin noted. The Defense Department represents over 50 percent of U.S. government expenditures in research and development.

“We can and must provide the leadership to focus these critical national resources,” he said. For the Pentagon, priority one should be the “rapid incorporation of those technologies into new military capabilities.”

Griffin said the Pentagon currently faces the “most technically challenging future defense environment we have seen since the Cold War.” A top priority in his job will be “protecting the technological edge of our U.S. forces.”

Griffin is expected to be swiftly confirmed. He brings a strong technology and government background to the defense research and engineering job, a new position that Congress created specifically to shake up the Pentagon’s bureaucracy and speed up the transition to technology from labs to the field.
Griffin served as NASA administrator during the George W. Bush administration. He headed the space department at Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory. He previously was president and chief operating officer of In-Q-Tel Inc., CEO of Orbital Sciences Corporation’s Magellan Systems division, and general manager of Orbital’s Space Systems Group.

As undersecretary of defense for research and engineering, Griffin would be dual-hatted as chief technology officer of the Department of Defense. The CTO will be the primary advisor to the secretary and the deputy secretary for all things technology.

Space Reforms

Because of his strong space background, Griffin is likely to be involved in ongoing efforts to reorganize the military’s space portfolio as mandated by Congress in the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act. Section 1601 of the NDAA included a number of reforms on space acquisition, management and oversight.

That point was raised by the committee’s top Democrat, Sen. Jack Reed. “You have a wealth of background on space, but let me be clear that the day-to-day job for which you are being confirmed is to be the chief technology and innovation officer of the department, and not for the management of space issues.”

In his written statement, Griffin said he would pay equal attention to all “warfighting domains, including space.” Space is “essential to achieving our national security objectives,” he said. “Our adversaries understand this and have taken concerted efforts to deny this advantage.” For that reason, the Pentagon needs to “maintain and enhance military superiority in space.”

On specific space technologies such as satellites, Griffin said the Pentagon should tap the considerable commercial investment in microsatellites and cubesats to “facilitate research and enable resilience in areas such as sensing, environmental forecasting, and communications.”

With regard to space launch, he said the Pentagon should “continue to work with new and existing commercial entrants.” He also suggested the Pentagon should increase collaboration with NASA, especially as military begins to focus on a national initiative in hypersonics.

Griffin said the Chinese have conducted nearly 20 times as many hypersonic flight vehicle tests as the United States has done over a comparable period. “This is a capability they’ve developed that overflies our air defense, under-flies our missile defense and holds our sea and land bases at risk.”

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