• Home

by Brent Swancer      November 12, 2017        (mysteriousuniverse.org)

• Some people have psychic abilities far beyond the norm. Governments around the world have long sought to try and harness the untapped powers of the human mind to mixed results. Here are some of the oddest such experiments:
• Believing that the Soviets were engaged in psychic research, the U.S. government began exploring psychic powers in the 1970’s by establishing “Operation Stargate”, a special psychic phenomena unit at Fort Meade, Maryland.
• A psychic probe involved placing an individual into a self-hypnotic trance in a controlled darkened environment, and causing him/her to vocally describe images and other impressions that came to mind. The “viewer” would be given the parameters of a target area or an intelligence question and the subject’s verbalization would be closely monitored.
• In 1974, a Soviet site in present day Kazakhstan was targeted. The viewer was given the coordinates and was able to draw a layout of buildings and a massive crane. Satellite imagery would later confirm this as perfectly matching what the psychic had drawn.
• In 1976, a Stargate psychic named Rosemary Smith located within a few miles a Soviet bomber which had gone down in the jungles of Africa, allowing a team to recover the plane.
• In 1979, Stargate viewer Joseph McMoneagle described what he saw at the coordinates given as a low, grey windowless building wreathed in the stench of Sulphur. This was confirmed by a second viewer. It turned out to be a Chinese nuclear complex called Lop Nor.
• Also in 1979, a remote viewer describe seeing a drab building along the sea which stank of gasoline and harbored a weapon of some sort that looked like a “shark.” Later, satellite imagery would show that the base indeed held a massive new type of nuclear class of submarine that the Soviets called the Akula, which means “shark” in Russian.
• In 1987 the remote viewers were used to try and track down a CIA mole. They were able to divine the information that the man lived in Washington, was married to a Latin American woman, likely from Colombia, and drove an expensive foreign car. The mole was Aldrich Ames who lived in Washington, was married to a Columbian, and drove a Jaguar.
• For all of these successes there were just as many failures and ambiguities. Attempts to use the viewers to locate the whereabouts of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi in 1986 and fugitive Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega, attempts to locate certain weapons of war, and efforts to locate prisoners of war still kept after the Vietnam War, all failed to produce any actionable intelligence or useful information.
• Project Stargate was disbanded in 1995. With so many instances false positives and vague, confused, irrelevant, ambiguous, or flat out wrong data, the CIA to conclude that the technique was not worth pursuing for intelligence gathering purposes.
• In 2003, roughly 73,000 pages of Project Stargate records were declassified. However, another 17, 700 were marked as too sensitive to be released.
• In 1981, the Chinese government began testing psychic children who were able to teleport small objects from one place to the other, even through physical barriers.
• In 1990, further testing of psychic children by the Chinese teleported objects through sealed paper envelopes, paper bags, and glass bottles. The specimens would simply disappear from their resting place in the container to reappear somewhere else. Even living things such as insects made it through without any negative effects or noticeable change.
• Is any of this being used today? Are there psychic warriors in operation behind conflicts that we do not even know about? To what extent has any of this research been pursued and is it being covered up? [Editor’s Note] You betcha.

 

Do we humans harbor within us vast mental powers beyond our imagination? Are some of us gifted with psychic abilities far beyond the norm, and if so what does that mean for us as a society? Whether one believes in extra sensory perception, mental powers, or any of the phenomena that go with them, some governments of the world have certainly at some point or another taken notice to entertain the idea. After all, wouldn’t such amazing abilities be useful for warfare or intelligence gathering? Governments around the world have long sought to try and harness the untapped powers of the human mind to mixed results, and here are some of the oddest such experiments, which were perhaps surprisingly taken quite seriously in their time, perhaps not to be dismissed out of hand.

Although it had dabbled in extra sensory perception abilities in the 40s and 50s, the United States government began to truly pursue the potential application of psychic powers in warfare starting from the 1970s, when the U.S. Army, CIA, and Defense Intelligence Agency established a special unit at Fort Meade, Maryland, for the purpose of investigating psychic phenomena. Ordered by Maj. Gen. Edmund Thompson, then the Army’s top intelligence officer, and overseen by a Lt. Frederick Holmes “Skip” Atwater and later on Maj. Gen. Albert Stubblebine, what would be variously called Grill Flame, Sun Streak, and ultimately eventually fall under the general blanket code name of Project Stargate began here, and one of the main original focuses of the research was into what is referred to as “remote viewing,” or basically the ability for a psychic operative to observe and describe places, information, or objects from afar.

Left: Maj. Gen. Edmund Thompson, Right: Maj. Gen. Albert Stubblebine

The great potential military application for this sort of thing is obvious, and the U.S. government pursued it with vigor, believing that the Soviets were also engaged in such research and vice versa, essentially setting off a sort of “psychic arms race,” so to speak. One part of an overview of the project that is part of declassified documents stated:

Driven by the notion that the Soviets might develop capabilities in this area, key personalities in the intelligence community were determined to explore the potential usefulness of psychic phenomena.
It was not a particular extravagant affair at first, poorly funded, run out of an old, decrepit barracks and only employing around 20 people or less in the beginning, and although there were certainly those in the military who thought it was all a bonkers, crackpot idea, the organization itself was very serious about what they were investigating. Psychics were recruited to the program, who then underwent scientific tests of their supposed abilities and programs to try and hone them in order to basically create an army of psychic spies. One former researcher with the program describes what they did thus:

In short, it involved placing an individual in a controlled darkened environment, descending him or her into a self-hypnotic trance and causing him/her to vocally describe images and other impressions that came to mind. In an intelligence context, the subject would be given some parameters of a target area or an intelligence question and the subject’s verbalization would be closely monitored.

There were a few stand out supposed successes within the secretive program in the over 20 years that it existed. In 1974, a Soviet site called Semipalatinsk, located in present day Kazakhstan was targeted as a suspicious location by the U.S. government for reasons it did not seem willing to discuss. Not much was known about the location at the time, and a remote viewer with the program was tasked with trying to get a peek at what was going on in there. The viewer was given the coordinates of the site, after which he managed to draw a layout of buildings and a surprisingly massive crane, and stated that it seemed to be a facility for perhaps housing missiles underground. Amazingly, satellite imagery would later confirm this, perfectly matching what the psychic had drawn out during his visions.

In 1976, the remote viewers were tasked with the mission of trying to track down the whereabouts of a downed Soviet bomber, which had gone down into the wilds of Africa and vanished into the jungle. The CIA came to Stargate in desperation more than anything else, as all other attempts to locate the missing plane had met with failure, including satellite imaging, ground searches, and human intelligence. One psychic named Rosemary Smith, who also happened to be a secretary at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, managed to conjure up location of the downed plane to within a few miles. A team was sent to the area that she had described and discovered the crash site, an unbelievable feat and no one was able to figure out how this woman could have possibly produced this intelligence that no one else could. It was seen as evidence that the technique could work.

In another instance in 1979, a man once only known as Remote Viewer #1, who was actually named Joseph McMoneagle, under deep hypnosis described what he saw at the coordinates given to him by his handler. He explained that he could see a low, grey windowless building wreathed in the stench of sulphur, which he then drew onto some paper. This same image would be reproduced independently by a Remote Viewer #29, with the two drawn images being strikingly similar and the added detail that the place had numerous pieces of heavy machinery and that there was smelting of some sort going on. In both cases, the descriptions and the drawings closely matched a Chinese nuclear complex called Lop Nor, which was located in those coordinates and which neither of the men had ever seen with their own eyes, nor had had any contact with each other.

Also in 1979 was the case of remote viewers from an offshoot of the program called Detachment G to look into a shadowy and secret Soviet Naval base. In this case, the psychics were able to describe seeing a drab building along the sea which stank of gasoline and harbored a weapon of some sort that looked like a “shark.” Later, satellite imagery would show that the base indeed held a massive new type of nuclear class of submarine that the Soviets called the Akula, which means “shark” in Russian.

In 1987 the remote viewers were used to try and track down a CIA mole, and several of the viewers were able to divine the information that the man lived in Washington, was married to a Latin American woman, likely from Colombia, and drove an expensive foreign car. When the mole was found to be an Aldrich Ames in 1994 it was found that he did indeed live in Washington, was married to a Columbian, and drove a Jaguar. Spookily, the psychics had detailed this nearly a decade before.

Cases such as these kept the top secret agency going, with the government pumping an estimated $20 million into their activities. However, for all of these alleged successes there were just as many failures or instances where things were ambiguous to say the least. Attempts to use the viewers to locate the whereabouts of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi in 1986, fugitive Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega after the U.S. invasion of the country, attempts to locate certain weapons of war, and efforts to locate prisoners of war still kept after the Vietnam War, among others, all failed to produce any actionable intelligence or useful information at all. On top of this, despite the occasional successes there were just too many instances of false positives and vague, confused, irrelevant, ambiguous, or flat out wrong data to make psychic powers a viable pursuit at the time. This led the CIA to conclude that the technique was not worth pursuing for intelligence gathering purposes, and that it was not ready for any real, trustworthy application in the field. Simply put, it was deemed to be more trouble than it was worth.

Other experiments carried out by the program were those dealing with telekinesis, clairvoyance, and even trying to stop the hearts of animals with the power of the mind, but none of them ever produced consistent, reproducible results, if any. Amidst growing skepticism and lack of clear results and lowered funding, Project Stargate was disbanded in 1995. Project Stargate is the subject of the 2004 book The Men Who Stare at Goats, by Jon Ronson, as well as the 2009 film of the same name. In 2003, the long top-secret, need-to-know only project saw roughly 73,000 pages of records declassified, yet interestingly a further 17, 700 were marked as too sensitive to be released. One wonders just what exactly is on those mysterious pages.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

by Jay Syrmopoulos     November 6, 2017     (www.activistpost.com)

  • On August 16, 1951, the French town of Pont-Saint-Esprit, located in southern France, experienced an outbreak of mass insanity which resulted in 4 deaths and 50 people interned in asylums. It was blamed on bread contaminated by ergot, a poisonous fungus.
  • In researching this incident for a book, H.P. Albarelli Jr. came upon a man named Frank Olson, a biochemist who suspiciously fell to his death from a 13th floor window in 1953. It turns out that Olsen was heading up research on the hallucinogen, LSD, on behalf of the CIA during the early days of the Cold War.
  • Albarelli says that former coworkers of Frank Olson told him that the Pont-Saint-Esprit incident was just a part of a variety of mind control experiments that had been carried out by the CIA at that time.
  • Albarelli found a 1949 top secret report issued by the research director of the Edgewood Arsenal, where many US government LSD experiments were carried out, which stated that the Army should do everything possible to launch “field experiments” using the drug.
  • Albarelli then found a CIA report from 1954 describing a conversation between a CIA agent and a representative of the Sandoz Chemical company in Switzerland, which was the only place where LSD was being produced at that time. The rep told the agent that the Pont-Saint-Esprit incident was not caused by ergot poisoning but by the CIA dosing the entire town with LSD as an experiment.
  • Certainly, the victims of this experiment did not consent. It is not known whether French authorities knew about the CIA experiment in Pont-Saint-Esprit.
  • [Editor’s Note] According to Wikipedia, most academic sources accept ergot poisoning as the cause of the Pont-Saint-Esprit “epidemic”. Albarelli’s speculation that the incident was a secret mind control experiment by the CIA is dismissed by mainstream historians and chemists. Surprise surprise.

 

For decades, after a French village was struck by mass insanity and hallucinations in 1951, it was widely believed that a local bakery’s flour had become contaminated by ergot, a poisonous fungus that occurs naturally on rye and causes hallucinations. However, a discovery by an investigative journalist doing research for a book about the incident uncovered damning evidence that the village’s food was intentionally contaminated with LSD as part of a secret CIA mind control experiment.

On August 16, 1951, numerous locals were suddenly stricken with horrifying
hallucinations of fire, dragons, and snakes, with dozens being committed to asylums and
hundreds left with varying degrees of madness. The incident was known locally as
the mystery of Le Pain Maudit (Cursed Bread).

Time magazine wrote at the time:
Among the stricken, delirium rose: patients thrashed wildly on their beds, screaming that red flowers were blossoming from their bodies, that their heads had turned to molten lead.

A local postman at the time, Leon Armunier, was doing his rounds in the town of Pont-Saint-Esprit when he was suddenly overcome by a feeling of nausea and wild hallucinations.

“It was terrible. I had the sensation of shrinking and shrinking, and the fire and the serpents coiling around my arms,” he told the BBC.

Armunier, now 87, fell off his bike and was taken to the hospital in Avignon.

He recalls being put in a straitjacket and sharing a room with three teenagers who had been chained to their beds to keep them under control.

“Some of my friends tried to get out of the window. They were thrashing wildly… screaming, and the sound of the metal beds and the jumping up and down… the noise was terrible.
“I’d prefer to die rather than go through that again,” Armunier said.

According to H.P. Albarelli Jr., who published a book about the experiment, the incident had nothing to do with ergot-contaminated bread, and instead was part of a top-secret mind control experiment conducted by the CIA.

Albarelli’s findings are based upon a CIA documents he uncovered while investigating the incident entitled: “Re: Pont-Saint-Esprit and F.Olson Files. SO Span/France Operation file, inclusive Olson. Intel files. Hand carry to Belin – tell him to see to it that these are buried.”

The Telegraph reports:
Mr Albarelli came across CIA documents while investigating the suspicious suicide of Frank Olson, a biochemist working for the SOD who fell from a 13th floor window two years after the Cursed Bread incident. One note transcribes a conversation between a CIA agent and a Sandoz official who mentions the “secret of Pont-Saint-Esprit” and explains that it was not “at all” caused by mould but by diethylamide, the D in LSD.

Further research revealed that F. Olson, according to the BBC, was Frank Olson – a scientist that had spearheaded research into LSD for the CIA, while Belin was a reference to David Belin, who was executive director of the Rockefeller Commission created by the White House in 1975 to investigate abuses carried out worldwide by the CIA.

The Pont-Saint-Esprit and F. Olson Files, mentioned in the document, would show – if they had not been “buried” – that the CIA was experimenting on the townspeople, by dosing them with LSD, according to Albarelli.

According to a BBC report:
It is well known that biological warfare scientists around the world, including some in Britain, were experimenting with LSD in the early 1950s – a time of conflict in Korea and an escalation of Cold War tensions.

Albarelli says he has found a top secret report issued in 1949 by the research director of the Edgewood Arsenal, where many US government LSD experiments were carried out, which states that the army should do everything possible to launch “field experiments” using the drug.

Using Freedom of Information legislation, he also got hold of another CIA report from 1954.
In it an agent reported his conversation with a representative of the Sandoz Chemical company in Switzerland.

Sandoz’s base, which is just a few hundred kilometres from Pont-Saint-Esprit, was the only place where LSD was being produced at that time.

The agent reports that after several drinks, the Sandoz representative abruptly stated: “The Pont-Saint-Esprit ‘secret’ is that it was not the bread at all… It was not grain ergot.”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

by Ethan Siegel     October 26, 2017      (forbes.com)

• With all the suffering in the world — starvation, disease, persecution, and natural disasters — it is often asked, why should we spend public money on an enterprise like fundamental scientific research?
• A NASA rocket scientist named Ernst Stuhlinger responded to this question in 1970. Stuhlinger dreamed of a manned mission to Mars as early as 1958, and advocated for increased investment in science and exploration throughout his entire life. In 2008 he passed away, at the age of 94, as one of the last surviving members of Operation Paperclip. Stuhlinger said:
• – Goals of high challenge provide strong motivation for innovative work which serves as a catalyst for further lofty goals.
• – A mission to Mars, for example, would bring new technologies worth many times the cost of its implementation.
• – We need more knowledge in physics and chemistry, in biology and physiology, and very particularly in medicine to cope with all these problems.
• – We need more knowledge in physics and chemistry, in biology and physiology, and in medicine to cope with all these problems which threaten man’s life: hunger, disease, contamination of food and water, and environmental pollution.
• – We need new material and methods, to invent better technical systems, to improve manufacturing procedures, to lengthen the lifetimes of instruments, and even to discover new laws of nature.
• – Each year, about a thousand technical innovations generated in the space program find their ways into our earthly technology where they lead to better kitchen appliances and farm equipment, better sewing machines and radios, better ships and airplanes, better weather forecasting and storm warning, better communications, better medical instruments, better utensils and tools for everyday life.
• – Higher food production through survey and assessment from orbit, and better food distribution through improved international relations, are only two examples of how profoundly the space program will impact life on earth.
• – The space program is taking over a function which for three or four thousand years has been the sad prerogative of wars.
• – Traveling to the Moon and eventually to Mars and to other planets is a venture which we should undertake now. In the long run, space exploration will contribute more to the solution of the grave problems we are facing here on earth than many other potential projects.
• – This will become a better earth, not only because of all the new technological and scientific knowledge which we will apply to the betterment of life, but also because we are developing a far deeper appreciation of our earth, of life, and of man.

 

As vast as our observable Universe is and as much as we can see, it’s only a tiny fraction of what must be out there.

Around the country and around the world, there is no shortage of human suffering. Poverty, disease, violence, hurricanes, wildfire and more are constantly plaguing humanity, and even our best efforts thus far can’t address all of everybody’s needs. Many are looking for places to cut funding, ostensibly to divert more to humanitarian needs, and one of the first places that comes up in conversation is “extraneous” spending on unnecessary scientific research. What good is it to conduct microgravity experiments when children are starving? Why smash particles together or pursue the lowest possible temperatures when Puerto Rico is still without power? And why study the esoteric mating habits of endangered species when nuclear war threatens our planet? To put it more succinctly:

With all the suffering in the world — starvation, disease, persecution, and natural disasters — why should we spend public money on an enterprise like fundamental scientific research?

This is a line of thinking that’s come up repeatedly throughout history. Yes, it’s short-sighted, in that it fails to recognize that our greatest problems require long-term investment, and that society’s greatest advances come about through hard work, research, development, and often are only realized years, decades, or generations after that investment is made. Investing in science is investing in the betterment of humanity.

But that’s not always an easy path to see, particularly when suffering is right in front of you. Back in early 1970, shortly after the first Apollo landing, a nun working in Zambia, Africa, Sister Mary Jucunda, wrote to NASA. She asked how they could justify spending billions on the Apollo program when children were starving to death. If one pictures these two images side-by-side, it hardly seems fair.

To invest in any one thing means to not invest in something else, but both science/space exploration and humanitarian relief are worthy of the investment of human resources.

The letter somehow made it to the desk of one of the top rocket scientists at NASA: Ernst Stuhlinger. At the time, Stuhlinger, one of the scientists brought to the United States as part of Operation Paperclip at the conclusion of World War II, was serving as the Associate Director of Science at NASA. Facing an accusation of inhumanity must have been particularly painful for someone who was still often accused of being a Nazi for his role in the German rocket program, but Stuhlinger was unshaken. He responded by writing the following letter, reprinted in its entirety, below. (It’s long, and it only contained one picture, but it’s arguably even more relevant today than it was in 1970.)

          Ernst Stuhlinger                                    and Werner Von Braun

Your letter was one of many which are reaching me every day, but it has touched me more deeply than all the others because it came so much from the depths of a searching mind and a compassionate heart. I will try to answer your question as best as I possibly can.
First, however, I would like to express my great admiration for you, and for all your many brave sisters, because you are dedicating your lives to the noblest cause of man: help for his fellowmen who are in need.

You asked in your letter how I could suggest the expenditures of billions of dollars for a voyage to Mars, at a time when many children on this earth are starving to death. I know that you do not expect an answer such as “Oh, I did not know that there are children dying from hunger, but from now on I will desist from any kind of space research until mankind has solved that problem!” In fact, I have known of famined children long before I knew that a voyage to the planet Mars is technically feasible. However, I believe, like many of my friends, that traveling to the Moon and eventually to Mars and to other planets is a venture which we should undertake now, and I even believe that this project, in the long run, will contribute more to the solution of these grave problems we are facing here on earth than many other potential projects of help which are debated and discussed year after year, and which are so extremely slow in yielding tangible results.

Before trying to describe in more detail how our space program is contributing to the solution of our earthly problems, I would like to relate briefly a supposedly true story, which may help support the argument. About 400 years ago, there lived a count in a small town in Germany. He was one of the benign counts, and he gave a large part of his income to the poor in his town. This was much appreciated, because poverty was abundant during medieval times, and there were epidemics of the plague which ravaged the country frequently. One day, the count met a strange man. He had a workbench and little laboratory in his house, and he labored hard during the daytime so that he could afford a few hours every evening to work in his laboratory. He ground small lenses from pieces of glass; he mounted the lenses in tubes, and he used these gadgets to look at very small objects. The count was particularly fascinated by the tiny creatures that could be observed with the strong magnification, and which he had never seen before. He invited the man to move with his laboratory to the castle, to become a member of the count’s household, and to devote henceforth all his time to the development and perfection of his optical gadgets as a special employee of the count.

The townspeople, however, became angry when they realized that the count was wasting his money, as they thought, on a stunt without purpose. “We are suffering from this plague” they said, “while he is paying that man for a useless hobby!” But the count remained firm. “I give you as much as I can afford,” he said, “but I will also support this man and his work, because I know that someday something will come out of it!”

Indeed, something very good came out of this work, and also out of similar work done by others at other places: the microscope. It is well known that the microscope has contributed more than any other invention to the progress of medicine, and that the elimination of the plague and many other contagious diseases from most parts of the world is largely a result of studies which the microscope made possible.

The count, by retaining some of his spending money for research and discovery, contributed far more to the relief of human suffering than he could have contributed by giving all he could possibly spare to his plague-ridden community.

The situation which we are facing today is similar in many respects. The President of the United States is spending about 200 billion dollars in his yearly budget. This money goes to health, education, welfare, urban renewal, highways, transportation, foreign aid, defense, conservation, science, agriculture and many installations inside and outside the country. About 1.6 percent of this national budget was allocated to space exploration this year. The space program includes Project Apollo, and many other smaller projects in space physics, space astronomy, space biology, planetary projects, earth resources projects, and space engineering. To make this expenditure for the space program possible, the average American taxpayer with 10,000 dollars income per year is paying about 30 tax dollars for space. The rest of his income, 9,970 dollars, remains for his subsistence, his recreation, his savings, his other taxes, and all his other expenditures.

You will probably ask now: “Why don’t you take 5 or 3 or 1 dollar out of the 30 space dollars which the average American taxpayer is paying, and send these dollars to the hungry children?” To answer this question, I have to explain briefly how the economy of this country works. The situation is very similar in other countries. The government consists of a number of departments (Interior, Justice, Health, Education and Welfare, Transportation, Defense, and others) and the bureaus (National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and others). All of them prepare their yearly budgets according to their assigned missions, and each of them must defend its budget against extremely severe screening by congressional committees, and against heavy pressure for economy from the Bureau of the Budget and the President. When the funds are finally appropriated by Congress, they can be spent only for the line items specified and approved in the budget.

The budget of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, naturally, can contain only items directly related to aeronautics and space. If this budget were not approved by Congress, the funds proposed for it would not be available for something else; they would simply not be levied from the taxpayer, unless one of the other budgets had obtained approval for a specific increase which would then absorb the funds not spent for space. You realize from this brief discourse that support for hungry children, or rather a support in addition to what the United States is already contributing to this very worthy cause in the form of foreign aid, can be obtained only if the appropriate department submits a budget line item for this purpose, and if this line item is then approved by Congress.
You may ask now whether I personally would be in favor of such a move by our government. My answer is an emphatic yes. Indeed, I would not mind at all if my annual taxes were increased by a number of dollars for the purpose of feeding hungry children, wherever they may live.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Copyright © 2017 Exopolitics Institute News Service. All Rights Reserved.