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Exoconscious Factor in Space Exploration

The release of How Exoconscious Humans Guide our Space-Faring Future

Phoenix, Arizona, October 16, 2018–What if the space exploration formula of computer science, robotics, meta-materials, and chemical rocketry lacks a key ingredient needed for advancement? In her recent book, How Exoconscious Humans Guide our Space Faring Future, Rebecca Hardcastle Wright, PhD, a former member of Apollo 14 Astronaut, Edgar Mitchell’s, Quantrek organization, proposes that humans having direct experience with extraterrestrial and multi-dimensional beings are the missing ingredient for space exploration.

According to Dr. Hardcastle Wright, founder of the non-profit Institute for Exoconsciousness, “Humans possess the ability to connect, communicate, and co-create with extraterrestrial and multi-dimensional beings through the vast field of consciousness. This ability to access the field of consciousness is an untapped resource for humanity’s ventures into space.”

The author examines experiencers’ advanced abilities.  “We use the term Exoconscious Humans to define those who integrate and utilize their on-going relationship with extraterrestrials and multi-dimensional beings. These individuals are transformed by contact events that include missing time, conscious out of body travel, the dissolving and rematerializing of matter that includes the body, and co-creative relationships with beings that leads to the adoption of innovative technological tools.”

Further, she asserts that direct experience of extraterrestrial and multi-dimensional beings is the basis for a revolution in science. “These individuals who contact, communicate, and co-create with extraterrestrial, multi-dimensional beings have experiences that material science fails to acknowledge or explain.  Their experiences pose unanswered questions that space travel requires. How and why do these experiences happen? Does consciousness impact human advancement in space? Who inhabits space and how do we communicate?

The book proposes that the study of consciousness science is necessary to travel and live off-planet because material science is reaching its known limits.

“At this point in technological science, information comes from a closed loop that is limited by repetitious circuitous data.  The frontiers of human consciousness hold vast resources waiting to be tapped as science moves into mind.”

How Exoconscious Humans Guide our Space-Faring Future is a practical proposal for integrating material and consciousness science through Exoconscious Humans. The book provides a comprehensive, documented overview of consciousness science, Ufology, space history, religion, astronaut witnesses, and the emerging diplomatic framework for space travel.

The Institute for Exoconsciousness is the first and only organization operating as a sustainable nonprofit, focused exclusively on scaling technology, teaching, art, and healing through co-creation between humans, extraterrestrials and multidimensionals. Our organization affirms that extraterrestrial and multidimensional contact accelerates social impact, co-creating a healthy cosmos.

 The Institute for Exoconsciousness is accelerating the impact of extraterrestrial and multidimensional experiencers, building an Exoconscious civilization.

More information about the book and the work of the Institute is available at www.exoconsciousness.com. Rebecca Hardcastle Wright is available for interviews.

   Rebecca Hardcastle Wright, PhD, is a leading expert and advocate in consciousness and extraterrestrial contact. She is CEO of the non-profit Institute for Exoconsciousness, an international community of ET, multi-dimensional experiencers. The Institute’s mission is to create a post-disclosure, Exoconscious civilization, supporting experiencers who pioneer education, training, media, art, and technology co-created with ET, multidimensionals. 

They’ve ‘Seen Things’

by Rozette Rago                 August 14, 2018                        (nytimes.com)


• UFO social groups are becoming popular. One such group was begun in Los Angeles by Robert Bingham, 62, who has held his annual UFO “Summon Events” in an LA park since 2010.  (seen above)  It began when Bingham was 39 and saw a 20-foot tall worm-shaped ship zipping through the clouds. He’s seen and taken photos of a ‘saucer’ and some flying objects shaped like beans. His photos began to attract dozens of believers from all over the world who come to share their own stories of UFOs and extraterrestrial communications. Bingham attempts to summon UFOs at these gatherings.

• “It’s a great community because you can talk about anything and you’re not worried about being called crazy,” said Hans Boysen, 53, who has participated in the last seven summoning sessions with Bingham since 2011. Boysen has gone on to co-found another group called the L.A. U.F.O. Channel who meet monthly.

• Rafael Cebrian, 29, a two-time attendee, brought a curious friend who was visiting from Spain. He said it was about being open and being in the right state of mind.

• Angel Llewellyn, 49, drove to Bingham’s event from San Jose, California, for a second year as a form of pilgrimage. “It’s like he charges you,” she said (as in ‘inspires’ you, not as in charging you admission). “He teaches you how to call [UFOs] and what to think and they just, boom, boom, boom. It’s like fishing. You never know what you’re going to get.”

• Other groups like the U.F.O. and Paranormal Research Society focus on discussions, often with speakers who talk about their research and experiences. A nonprofit group called the Mutual U.F.O. Network, or Mufon, founded in 1969, has over 4,000 members worldwide and convenes a yearly symposium. This year, a former Pentagon intelligence officer, Luis Elizondo, will give the Mufon keynote address. Many in the community believe that organizations such as the ‘To The Stars Academy for Arts and Science’, headed by Elizondo and former Blink-182 guitarist Tom DeLonge, are just the beginning to discovering the truth about ETs and UFOs.

• Yasmin Joyner, 35, an artist, recently formed another UFO discussion group, Indigo Army, that she hopes will attract a younger and more diverse crowd. Its members organize sightings at one another’s houses and nearby parks. Joyner says she understands that there are consequences to being outspoken about beliefs that many people may deem weird or crazy. “I think my family was a bit worried that I had snapped or something, but once they saw my footage and what I was seeing, they understood,” she said.

• Mallory Jackson, 26, who attends ‘hangouts’ led by Mr. Bingham and the Indigo Army, says she finds it difficult to maintain relationships outside the U.F.O. community with people who might not be as understanding of her interests. “[Y]ou’ll see all ages, all ethnicities, all genders,” says Ms. Jackson. “It’s beautiful, and we’re all just trying to figure it out as we go.” She became friends with several members “right away” before meeting another longtime attendee of Mr. Bingham’s events, Jim Martin, 38, who is now her boyfriend.

• How exactly does the group try to summon UFOs? Most agree that it’s similar to meditating, accompanied by a physical sensation. Joyner says the important thing is to focus. At the event in April, some participants closed their eyes and stood silently. Some stared intently into the sky. When someone spots something, they train a telescope on the object which is connected to a camera and a screen that shows and records what is being seen. They post the best videos on their YouTube channel.

 

Robert Bingham has “seen things.” When he was 39, he looked skyward and noticed a worm-shaped ship about 20 feet tall zipping through the clouds.

Unusual things kept popping up around him — or above him, rather. He saw a saucer and some flying objects shaped like beans next. He snapped a picture.

For over ten years, he kept his sightings to himself. That changed in 2010, when his neighbor came over to do some plumbing work. Mr. Bingham showed him his photos. The neighbor asked if he could invite his brother, who was very interested in unidentified flying objects, or U.F.O.s.

In awe of what they saw, they asked if they could invite more people to speak with Mr. Bingham — 40 more, actually. More than eight years ago, that was the first meeting of what is now known as “Summon Events with Robert Bingham,” at a park in Los Angeles across the street from where Mr. Bingham worked as a security guard.

Mr. Bingham, 62, an unassuming man who describes himself as shy, has become the nexus of a community of U.F.O. hunters in Los Angeles, fervent believers who come together to share their stories and persuade skeptics that extraterrestrial communications aren’t just a conceit for television shows.

Since then, he has attracted U.F.O. enthusiasts from all over the world, drawn together by the same questions: What are these things in the sky, exactly, and how can we learn more about them?

While there is just not enough documentation or scientific evidence to begin to explain or even confirm these sightings, that doesn’t stop the dozens of people that once a year descend on the same park to watch and assist Mr. Bingham as he tries to summon the “objects,” as they call them, and also to hang out with other enthusiasts who have turned into friends.

“It’s a great community because you can talk about anything and you’re not worried about being called crazy,” said Hans Boysen, 53, who has participated in the last seven summoning sessions with Bingham since 2011.

Other groups, like the U.F.O. and Paranormal Research Society, don’t organize sighting sessions, but rather focus on discussions, often with speakers who talk about their research and experiences. A nonprofit group called the Mutual U.F.O. Network, or Mufon, founded in 1969, has over 4,000 members worldwide and convenes a yearly symposium. This year, a former Pentagon intelligence officer, Luis Elizondo, will give the keynote address.

Last year, The New York Times conducted interviews and obtained records pertaining to the $22 million spent on the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program. The program — parts of which remain classified — investigated reports of unidentified flying objects, according to Defense Department officials. According to the article, officials insisted that the effort had ended after five years, in 2012. The article also stated that Sara Seager, an astrophysicist at M.I.T., cautioned that not knowing the origin of an object does not mean that it is from another planet or galaxy. “When people claim to observe truly unusual phenomena, sometimes it’s worth investigating seriously,” she said. But, she added, “what people sometimes don’t get about science is that we often have phenomena that remain unexplained.”

As much as scientists deal with probabilities, they rely on data and the reality is, no matter how many videos people upload on YouTube, they’re simply not enough to draw any definitive conclusions from.

But that doesn’t stop this community from searching. Many in the community that forms around Mr. Bingham believe that the multimillion-dollar alien research efforts of the former Blink-182 guitarist and singer Tom DeLonge are just the beginning to finding out some answers. Mr. DeLonge made headlines after To the Stars Academy of Arts & Science, a research group he founded — Mr. Elizondo is its director of global security and special programs — released declassified footage from the Department of Defense and continues his efforts.

Angel Llewellyn, 49, drove to the event from San Jose, Calif., for a second year as a form of pilgrimage. She said she started seeing things right after attending to Mr. Bingham’s event for the first time.

“It’s like he charges you,” she said. “He teaches you how to call them and what to think and they just, boom, boom, boom. It’s like fishing. You never know what you’re going to get.”

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What Would Happen If UFOs Tried to Contact Earth?

by Sebastian Kettley                     August 20, 2018                     (express.co.uk)

• Are the people of earth ready for open extraterrestrial contact? A September 2015 YouGov poll found more than 56 percent of Germans believed in the existence of alien life. The German Ministry of Economics, however, said it considered aliens visiting the earth “extremely unlikely according to current scientific knowledge”.

• An August 2017 survey conducted by 20th Century Fox film studio found nearly half of all Americans believe in aliens. Almost as many were certain aliens are visiting Earth on a regular basis but less than 20 percent found stories of alien abductions genuine. Even less claimed to have ever seen a UFO.

• A report published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2018 found people across the board would react positively to alien visitors. Michael Varnum of Arizona State University said based on a mix of media headlines and surveys, the overall public response would be optimistic.

• How would the earth’s institutions respond to first contact? The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) stipulates anyone who encounters extraterrestrial signals has to immediately broadcast them to the rest of the world. The Post-Detection Task Group, a branch of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), similarly says international governments would have to pool resources together to beam back a joint message.

• The US Air Force’s 527th Space Aggressor Squadron (527 SAS) at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, is the first line of defense against space-based threats. Captain Dustyn Carroll, aggressor training flight commander at the base said, “We then teach joint and coalition forces what adversaries may or may not do, and then we go out and replicate it ourselves.”

• Most scientists today assume first contact with extraterrestrials would be achieved through a clear signal beamed to Earth and not by intercepting alien spacecraft. Seth Shostak of the SETI Institute said, “… [Y]ou would have a press conference and announce this to the world.” Then, says Shostak, he would evacuate from the city as soon as the first UFOs appeared in the skies. Alien visitors capable of reaching Earth would likely have the technology to do how they please with the planet.

[Editor’s Note]   It appears that the people on the planet are far more open and accepting of extraterrestrial contact than are the world’s governments, military and “scientific” organizations set up to deal with extraterrestrial contact. The institutional organizations remain dutifully diligent in denying any current extraterrestrial contact with humanity, and in spreading their skepticism and fear of the ‘dangerous and evil space aliens’. However, their mind-control is beginning to wear off. Greater numbers of ordinary people are not only accepting the existence of extraterrestrials, but are optimistic of a positive relationship developing between ET beings and humans here on earth.

 

A YouGov poll published in September 2015 found more than 56 percent of polled Germans believed in the existence of alien life.

But Germany has “no plans or protocol” if alien visitors ever attempt to contact the human race.

In response to questions submitted to the government, the German Ministry of Economics said it considered such an event “extremely unlikely according to current scientific knowledge”.

The Government said in a statement on the matter: “Concrete cases that could have been subject of bilateral or multilateral talks with other states are not known.”

There is very little in terms of official legislation on how the Earth should collectively react but there are some guidelines set in place by scientific institutions.

The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) stipulates anyone who encounters extraterrestrial signals has to immediately broadcast them to the rest of the world.

The Post-Detection Task Group, a branch of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), similarly says international governments would have to pool resources together to beam back a joint message.

The USA also appears to be greatly prepared for the threat of space-based attacks with an entire unit of the United States Air Force assigned to combating space-cable adversaries.

The 527th Space Aggressor Squadron (527 SAS), stationed at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, is the first line of defence against space-based threats.

The 527 SAS regularly conducts drills and develops techniques to better prepare for attacks from above.

Captain Dustyn Carroll, aggressor training flight commander, said: “We replicate adversary tactics.

“We want to know what our adversaries are capable of, study that and see how we can apply that.

“We then teach joint and coalition forces what adversaries may or may not do, and then we go out and replicate it ourselves.”

An August 2017 survey conducted by film studio 20th Century Fox found nearly half of all Americans believe in aliens.

Almost as many were certain aliens are visiting Earth on a regular basis but less than 20 percent found stories of alien abductions genuine.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

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