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by Hannah Jones                  May 24, 2018                      (citypages.com)

• On August 27, 1979, Marshall County (Minnesota) Deputy sheriff Val Johnson was driving in a road about ten miles outside of Stephen MN on a clear night when he saw an 8- to 12-inch ball of light floating about three-and-a-half feet off the ground, zooming along the road. He sped up, following the glowing orb down a dark stretch of road. Suddenly the bright light was upon him, and he remembered the sound of glass breaking and the brakes seizing up.

• Johnson woke up 39 minutes later with his head on the steering wheel. His car was sitting on its side, halfway off the road in the opposite lane. His head hurt. His eyes hurt. But he managed to radio headquarters to say that something hit his car. The windshield was shattered and the hood dented. (see image above) The patrol car’s antennae were bent backward and one of the headlights was busted. An ambulance took Johnson to a hospital. He was treated and released for eye burns, the kind welders get from staring at the sparks.

• During questioning, they noticed his watch was 14 minutes behind. Johnson had always been fastidious about syncing his watch and his car clock with headquarters when he started his shifts. They also discovered the clock in his car was 14 minutes slow.

• They called in Allan Hendry, an investigator with the Center for UFO Studies in Illinois. Hendry studied the car and the circumstances, and determined that it wasn’t a hoax. Other experts were called in but none could explain the incident. Johnson and his family were inundated in calls from the press. But as time went on, other headlines crowded the front page and the event fell into relative obscurity. Then along came the internet. “There’s probably more interest in [Johnson] now than there was 20 years ago,” says Kent Broten, president of the Marshall County Historical Society. The Marshall County Museum still has Johnson’s car, and it’s one of their most popular exhibits.

• To this day, the incident remains unsolved.

 

It was late August in Marshall County, 1979. Deputy sheriff Val Johnson was on patrol in his Ford LTD at 1:30 a.m., heading out on County Road 5. He got about 10 miles away from Stephen when he saw a light through the driver’s side window.

It was an 8- to 12-inch ball of light floating about three-and-a-half feet off the ground, zooming along the road. Johnson thought it had to be a truck with a busted headlight. But it was too bright for that. Whatever it was, Johnson decided to follow it.

He sped up to 55 mph, following the glowing orb down a dark stretch of country road. He’s not certain what happened next. One second the light was dead ahead, and the next it was upon him, painfully bright. All he remembers is the sound of glass breaking and the brakes seizing up.

He woke up 39 minutes later with his head on the steering wheel. He raised it to take in a sideways view of the world. His car was sitting on its side, halfway off the road in the opposite lane. His head hurt. His eyes hurt. But he managed to radio headquarters.

When they asked what was wrong, he told them he honestly didn’t know. All he knew was that something hit his car.

Rescuers found his car in a sorry state. The windshield was shattered, and there was a hefty dent in the hood. The antennae were folded neatly backward, with all the desiccated corpses of careless insects still attached. One of the headlights was busted.

An ambulance transported Johnson to a Warren hospital. Doctors determined he’d sustained eye burns, the kind welders get from staring at the sparks shooting off their instruments. He was treated and released.

He told Sheriff Dennis Brekke what he saw. He had no explanation for it. During questioning, they noticed his watch was 14 minutes behind. This was strange for Johnson. He had always been fastidious about syncing his watch and his car clock with headquarters when he started his shifts. They also discovered the clock in his car was 14 minutes slow.

The department was dumbfounded. They had no idea how any of this could be explained. That’s when Brekke called the Center for UFO Studies in Illinois. UFO investigator Allan Hendry turned up in Warren the next day.

Hendry was an astronomer, ufologist and advocate for the “scientific study of UFOs.” His book, “The UFO Handbook: A Guide to Investigating, Evaluating, and Reporting UFO Sightings” was all about being comprehensive and critical of supposed encounters, and separating tricks of the mind from the truly unexplained. Hendry studied the car and the circumstances. He came to only one conclusion: whatever happened, this wasn’t a hoax.

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by Robbie Graham                 May 24, 2018                    (mysteriousuniverse.org)

• In June of 1983, Debbie Jordan-Kauble abducted from her parents’ home and taken aboard an egg-shaped craft by ETs who impregnated her. They later removed the fetus and eventually introduced her to her human-alien hybrid child. She experienced other interactions with ET beings through her life.

• In 1987, noted ufologist and writer Budd Hopkins published his book Intruders: The Incredible Visitations at Copley Woods in follow-up to his instant classic, Missing Time, in 1981. In 1992, Intruders was adapted for a CBS television mini-series starring Richard Krenna as a psychologist investigating abductions including that of Jordan-Kauble, based on both Hopkins and the Harvard psychiatrist, John Mack, as Hopkins didn’t perform the abductee’s hypnosis himself.

• Tracy Torme, staff writer for the tv show “Star Trek the Next Generation” and son of legendary singer Mel Torme, was tapped to write the Intruders mini-series. Torme recalls that alien abduction movies were a hard sell in the late-1980s-early-1990s because abductions hadn’t yet entered the cultural zeitgeist. Torme says that he closely observed Hopkins in his UFO abduction research. “What Hopkins was uncovering,” said Torme, “were these clear patterns in abductions… pattern, after pattern, after pattern.” The more Torme worked with Hopkins, the more he became personally convinced of the reality of these abductions. “I’d just met too many people who were very sincere and who did not want their names in the newspaper, who did not want to be a part of UFO phenomena. They were victims in a lot of ways. They were damaged people; damaged by the experience.”

• Today, Torme relates that although he respected John Mack, he did not share his perspective on the abduction phenomenon. “He [Mack] believed that this is all being done for the benefit of mankind, and they [ETs] are our kind of our saviors and our brothers… and that they’re here to help us and save us from destruction and all that. I just didn’t see it. I do not believe that they are intentionally hostile, but they seem to be lacking in emotions and they don’t treat human beings with the respect that they deserve.”

The Intruders CBS mini-series was generally well-received remains significant for its thoughtful and sympathetic treatment of the abduction phenomenon, intrusive examinations, alien impregnation, hybrid children, screen memories, and hypnotic regression. Says Torme, “I really believe this project was part of the process of people becoming aware of how these things [abductions] allegedly work.” It may have prompted the popularity of succeeding shows such as the “X-Files” in 1992 and others. By the end of the 1990’s the Gray alien had become a staple in ufology. “The way that the image of the Grays has since become known in society is incredible. They’ve seeped into… all aspects of society, and they’re now part of Americana. The image is now worldwide.”

 

1987 saw the publication of Budd Hopkins’ Intruders: The Incredible Visitations at Copley Woods. The book investigated the claims of a number of alleged alien abductees, but was more specifically concerned with the case of Debbie Jordan-Kauble (known in the book as “Kathie Davis”). Jordan-Kauble described having been abducted from her parents’ home in June of 1983 and being taken aboard an egg-shaped craft which had landed outside. She claimed to have been impregnated by her alien captors, who later removed the fetus and eventually introduced her to her human-alien hybrid child. Jordan-Kauble was dissatisfied with the treatment of her case in Hopkins’ book and later went on to write her own, more detailed account, not only of her 1983 abduction, but of other related experiences throughout her life. As to the nature and origin of these experiences, Jordan-Kauble once mused:

                      Budd Hopkins

“I have had so many different types of experience with so many different aspects of this field that I am somewhat mixed as to what I think they are and where they come from. I have seen the hard evidence that debunkers claim does not exist. I have also experienced the psychological and physical effects, as well as the spiritual awakening of a close encounter. I am also smart enough to realize how powerful the human mind can be when faced with something that it cannot comprehend. All I have ever been able to do was report what I saw and let everyone else sort it all out.”

Hopkins’ Intruders book would later be very loosely adapted for television by screenwriter Tracy Tormé —son of legendary jazz singer and musician Mel Tormé. The 1992 mini-series was concerned less with the Jordan-Kauble story and more with the broader abduction phenomenon as it was then understood by the leading researchers in the field, namely Hopkins and Harvard psychiatrist, John Mack.

                               John Mack

In the mini-series, a psychiatrist, Dr. Chase (Richard Crenna), investigates the abductions of two seemingly unconnected women from different American states and, in the process, immerses himself in broader research into the UFO phenomenon. Eventually, he and a local UFOlogist start a therapy group where abductees can collectively attempt to make sense of their traumatic experiences. Richard Crenner’s psychiatrist character was modelled on both Hopkins and Mack. Crenner wears an oversized woollen fisherman’s sweater throughout, clearly inspired by Hopkins’ trademark garment. The actor drew greater influence from Mack, spending time with the Harvard psychiatrist in order to study his mannerisms.

Debbie Jordan-Kauble

I interviewed Tormé a few years back. He explained his writing process for Intruders and the cultural climate in which it was written. Tormé had been attempting to get an abduction movie off the ground long before Intruders. “I optioned Budd Hopkins’ first book, Missing Time, and spent three long years trying to get it launched in Hollywood,” the screenwriter told me of his initial effort. “At that time people didn’t take abductions very seriously and it seemed like a very odd subject to launch for a multi-million-dollar movie. This was in the early-to-mid 1980s.”

Tormé emphasized to me that abduction movies were a hard sell in the late-1980s-early-1990s:


“At that time there was not a lot of interest in this subject. People wonder why it was such a struggle to get these kinds of movies made. But the public really did not know about the abduction phenomenon. They weren’t following it, they weren’t reading about it. It had not broken through in a big way in the mass media.”

Tormé had developed a close relationship with Budd Hopkins during his research for the Missing Time movie and was an admirer of his work. “I felt he was a very good person, a very good thinker,” said Tormé of Hopkins. “He’d invite me to witness regression hypnosis sessions that he was conducting with abductees. I was hearing these stories that sounded so much like science-fiction, so unbelievable, but what Hopkins was uncovering were these clear patterns in abductions… pattern, after pattern, after pattern.” Tormé was also struck by the artistic renderings of the abductors shown to him by Hopkins:

“He had a great collection of different drawings of the beings made by various abductees, and it was amazing how similar they were to each other. This was at a time when no one knew about so-called Grays. This is back in the early 1980s when if you asked a hundred people what an alien was, you get a hundred different answers.”

                            Tracy Torme

As time passed, the initially undecided screenwriter became    a believer in the reality of the phenomenon:

“The more of Hopkins’ sessions I observed, and the more abductees I met, I became 98 percent convinced that this stuff was real. I couldn’t say 100 percent, because I hadn’t seen anything with my own eyes. But I’d just met too many people who were very sincere and who did not want their names in the newspaper, who did not want to be a part of UFO phenomena. They were victims in a lot of ways. They were damaged people; damaged by the experience. They expressed to me how they really didn’t like that they were never asked to go along with this [the abduction experience]; that this would happen to them if they liked it or not. They were very disturbed by that, and that made a big mark on me.”

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by Mike Ferguson             May 10, 2018                  (billingsgazette.com)

• Joan Bird, the author of Montana UFOs and Extraterrestrials, tells of a couple of the more famous cases of Montana citizens seeing a UFO.

• In 1950, Nick Mariana and his secretary watched two silver objects moving together across the sky. They took video of the spinning discs, but nearby Malmstrom Air Force Base officials took Mariana’s film and “removed the good stuff,” said Bird.

• In the summer of 1940, Udo Wartena was in the Confederate Gulch in Broadwater County near Montana state capitol, Helena, when he heard a humming noise and spied a 100-foot saucer hovering over a meadow. A saucer landed and an occupant came out of the saucer. The ‘alien’ apologized to Wartena saying, “We didn’t know you were here. We need water. Can we take some of yours?” The human-looking alien (who also spoke English) invited Wartena to board the saucer and showed him two counter-rotating magnets that the aliens used to nullify Earth’s gravity.

• “They were men just like us, and very nice chaps,” Wartena told his daughter. She said her father “felt remarkable love or comfort in their presence and did not want to leave them.” Wartena told his story to a few people but suffered ridicule afterward.

• Citing the Foundation for Research into Extraterrestrial Encounters, Bird says a majority of the 3,500 people claiming contact with extraterrestrials said following their encounter they felt increased compassion, a deeper interest in spiritual matters, an increased concern for the welfare of the planet and a conviction that there’s life after death. What they felt less of was a concern with material things, an interest in organized religion, a fear of death and the desire to become more well-known. Only 15 percent reported having a negative experience, she said.

[Editor’s Note] This incident in the summer of 1940 could be one of the earliest cases of an encounter with the “Space Brothers”, members of the German Vril Society space program, which was a benevolent group led by Maria Orsic that promoted peace and brotherhood as a counter-point to the emergent and malevolent Nazi/Draco space program. See this past ExoNews article for more on UFOs over Montana and the Nick Mariana UFO sighting.

 

Joan Bird believes in UFO sightings and stories of human contact with extraterrestrials, but after immersing herself in testimony and research, “I sometimes have to back off and go watch birds or something.”

“There is a limit to how much we can take,” the Helena author told a crowd of about 45 people Wednesday at the Western Heritage Center. “I know this is a lot to digest, but keep chewing.”

A trained zoologist and biologist with an earned doctorate, Bird wrote the book “Montana UFOs and Extraterrestrials.” She’s scheduled to speak again at noon Thursday at the Western Heritage Center in a talk sponsored by Humanities Montana.

With a smile, she noted her book “earned me a five-saucer review from UFO Magazine” before the periodical ceased publication in 2012.

Bird’s talk focused in part on people claiming UFO sightings in Montana. One, Nick Mariana, who was working in 1950 for the then-Great Falls Electrics minor league baseball team (now the Voyagers), shot film that purportedly shows two silver objects moving together in the sky. Mariana’s secretary said she also saw them.

Bird’s research showed that Malmstrom Air Force Base officials took Mariana’s film and “removed the good stuff,” she said. The original film reportedly showed the discs spinning.

Closer to home, Udo Wartena said he was prospecting in the Confederate Gulch in Broadwater County during the summer of 1940 when he heard a humming noise and spied a 100-foot saucer hovering over a meadow. He said someone came out of the saucer apologizing. “We didn’t know you were here,” the alien told Wartena. “We need water. Can we take some of yours?”

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